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Reproduced from Federal Reserve Bank of New York; Chart: Axios Visuals

The New York Fed's new weekly economic index fell to -12 for the week ended May 9, dropping from -11.14 the previous week. The index's decline is now three times greater than the worst contraction seen during the Great Recession.

What it means: "The WEI is an index of real economic activity using timely and relevant high-frequency data," per the N.Y. Fed. "It represents the common component of ten different daily and weekly series covering consumer behavior, the labor market, and production."

  • The index's inputs range from electricity output and rail traffic to jobless claims and consumer confidence and seek to provide a timely snapshot of U.S. GDP expectations.

Go deeper: States face economic death spiral from coronavirus

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Aug 19, 2020 - Economy & Business

Investors still don't believe the stock market's rally can last

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The S&P 500 closed at a new all-time high on Tuesday and has rallied by around 52% since hitting its low point on March 23 — the best run the index has ever had in such a short time.

The state of play: While the market has continued to rise for the past five months, most investors have been incredulous about the sustainability of gains.

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

4 hours ago - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.

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