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A person watching North Korea leader Kim Jong-un on a television in Seoul, South Korea, in January 2021. Photo: Jung Yeon-je/AFP via Getty Images

The South Korean military said North Korea fired at least two unidentified projectiles into the East Sea on Thursday local time. Japan's prime minister said the projectiles were ballistic missiles, according to AP.

Driving the news: The latest test comes one day after news broke that the North had tested a short-range cruise missile system last weekend, though U.S. officials described that test as “normal military activity."

Context: Nuclear talks between the U.S. and North Korea stalled under the Trump administration, and North Korean recently rebuffed the Biden administration's attempts to restart negotiations.

  • Kim Yo-jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, warned the U.S. to "refrain from causing a stink" if "it wants to sleep in peace for coming four years" last week, as Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin were visiting South Korea and Japan.

What they're saying: Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said in a tweet Thursday that North Korea fired two ballistic missiles, which fell outside of Japan's territory.

  • "It threatens the peace and security of Japan and the region and is a violation of UN resolutions. I strongly protest and strongly condemn it," Suga added.

The big picture: U.S. and South Korean officials are still analyzing the launches to determine what the projectiles were, according to AP.

  • If North Korea did launch ballistic missiles, it would, as Suga noted, have violated United Nations Security Council Resolutions on the country’s nuclear and missile activities.
  • The move would also mark the country's first major missile test since President Biden took office.

Editor's note: This story is developing. Please check back for details.

Go deeper

Biden administration will host Japan and South Korea for North Korea discussions

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. Photo: API/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

The White House will host security officials from Japan and South Korea in Washington, D.C., next week for “intensive consultations” on North Korea, senior Biden administration officials told reporters on Tuesday.

Driving the news: Officials acknowledged reports that North Korea performed a series of missile tests over the weekend, first reported by the Washington Post, but downplayed that news by calling it “normal military activity.”

What we know about the victims of the Indianapolis mass shooting

Officials load a body into a vehicle at the site of the mass shooting in Indianapolis. Photo:

Eight people who were killed along with several others who were injured in a Thursday evening shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis have been identified by local law enforcement.

The big picture: The Sikh Coalition said at least four of the eight victims were members of the Indianapolis Sikh community.

Pompeo, wife misused State Dept. resources, federal watchdog finds

Former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The State Department's independent watchdog found that former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo violated federal ethics rules when he and his wife asked department employees to perform personal tasks on more than 100 occasions, including picking up their dog and making private dinner reservations.

Why it matters: The report comes as Pompeo pours money into a new political group amid speculation about a possible 2024 presidential run.