KRT via AP Video

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said a North Korean ballistic missile has passed over Japan, per CNBC, noting it's an "unprecedented, serious and grave threat." It landed in the ocean, according to Japan's chief Cabinet secretary and broke into three pieces, per Japanese broadcaster NHK. Yonhap News Agency reports it flew about 2700 km, which would indicate it was a medium-range missile.

  • South Korea's presidential office is convening a National Security Council meeting, per Yonhap News Agency.
  • The Japanese government warned citizens in northern Japan to take cover in solid buildings or underground shelters, per CNBC.
  • A new step: This appears to be the first time North Korea's launched a ballistic missile over Japan, and marks an aggressive escalation; normally tests are shot upwards or "lofted." North Korea has previously launched rockets over Japan, which it has claimed it was doing to put satellites, not weapons, in space, per BBC. The key difference here is rockets are unguided whereas missiles have a guidance system to steer towards a target.

Why it matters: Josh Pollack, Editor of The Nonproliferation Review, told Axios, "this is a big first. They warned they might do this back in early June and then again a few weeks ago in connection with Guam. But the Japanese are bound to be angered and dismayed. Not that there's much they can do."

Be smart: Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations tweeted, "N Korea missile test over Japan will stimulate missile defense buildup as well as intensify consideration of preventive military action"

Japan did not attempt to shoot down the missile according to NHA, a Japanese broadcaster. Col. Rob Manning, director of press operations at the Department of Defense, said this did not pose a threat to North America, ABC News reports.

This comes amid U.S. and South Korean joint military exercises, which North Korea perceives as rehearsal for invasion. August 28 was the final day of exercises for thousands of Japanese and U.S. troops in northern Japan. North Korea also launched three projectiles this weekend, which U.S. Pacific Command assessed to not be a threat to the U.S.The post has been updated to reflect that North Korea has reportedly previously employed satellite launch vehicles that sent rockets over Japan.

Go deeper

Updated 14 mins ago - World

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrested under national security law

Media tycoon Jimmy Lai at the Next Digital offices in Hong Kong in June. Photo: Anthony Wallace/AFP via Getty Images

Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Jimmy Lai has been arrested for "collusion with foreign powers," said Mark Simon, an executive at the tycoon's media firm Next Digital Monday morning local time.

Why it matters: He was arrested under the national security law imposed by China in late June that gives Beijing more powers over the former British colony. Lai is the most prominent person arrested under the law, which prompted the U.S. to sanction Chinese officials, including Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, over Beijing's efforts to strip the territory of its autonomy.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 19,769,560— Total deaths: 729,351 — Total recoveries — 12,030,061Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 5,041,573 — Total deaths: 162,913 — Total recoveries: 1,656,864 — Total tests: 61,792,571Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi says states don't have the funds to comply with Trump's executive order on unemployment — Mnuchin says Trump executive orders were cleared by Justice Department.
  4. States: New York reports lowest rate of positive coronavirus test results since pandemic began
  5. Public health: Ex-FDA head: U.S. will "definitely" see 200,000 to 300,000 virus deaths by end of 2020. 
  6. Schools: Nine test positive at Georgia school where photo showing packed hallway went viral — How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on.

New York reports new low positive coronavirus test rate

People physically distancing at tables in New York City's Times Square in June. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) announced Sunday 515 people, or 0.78% of those tested, returned a positive reading for COVID-19 the previous day.

Why it matters: It's the lowest single-day positive rate since the start of the pandemic. It's another sign that the state that was once a global coronavirus epicenter is curbing the spread of the virus. "Our daily numbers remain low and steady, despite increasing infection rates across the country, and even in our region," Cuomo said in a statement. "But we must not become complacent: Everyone should continue to wear their masks and socially distance."

Go deeper: Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning