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A boathouse in the middle of a storm surge caused by Hurricane Delta making landfall in Lake Charles, Louisiana, on Oct. 9, 2020. Photo: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

More tropical storms and hurricanes will take place during an "average" Atlantic hurricane season, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Friday in its new guidelines.

Why it matters: NOAA attributed the uptick in hurricanes to better reconnaissance technology and climate change warming the oceans and atmosphere, which may make the storms more common and destructive.

By the numbers: NOAA's new average is based on recorded storm and hurricane activity over a 30-year period from 1991-2020. Previously, the agency used the period from 1981-2010.

  • NOAA now considers the average number of named tropical storms in a given year to be 14, up from 12 named storms during its earlier reference period. The average number of hurricanes is now 7, compared to the former average of 6.
  • The average for major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5 with wind speeds over 110 miles per hour) remains unchanged at 3.

What they're saying: “These updated averages better reflect our collective experience of the past 10 years, which included some very active hurricane seasons,” said Matt Rosencrans, seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center.

  • “NOAA scientists have evaluated the impacts of climate change on tropical cyclones and determined that it can influence storm intensity."
  • "Further research is needed to better understand and attribute the impacts of anthropogenic forcings and natural variability on tropical storm activity," Rosencrans said.

The big picture: The Biden administration, in its first budget proposal to Congress unveiled on Friday, proposed $6.9 billion in funding for NOAA in the 2022 fiscal year.

  • That's up $1.4 billion from the amount allocated in the budget adopted for the 2021 fiscal year — and would be the largest increase for the agency if approved by Congress.

What's next: The new hurricane averages will apply to the 2021 Atlantic season, which begins on June 1 and runs through Nov. 30.

Go deeper

Biden's budget would boost climate, clean energy spending

Emissions rise from the Kentucky Utilities Co. Ghent generating station in Ghent, Ky., on April 6, 2021. Photo: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

President Biden's first budget request to Congress contains large increases in climate-change-related spending, on the order of $14 billion above the prior year's levels, according to a White House summary.

Why it matters: It provides details on how the White House hopes to translate its vow to act aggressively on global warming, both at home and abroad, into specific funding levels and agency-by-agency plans.

Biden unveils $1.52 trillion budget proposal

Biden speaking in the Rose Garden of the White House on April 8. Photo: Yuri Gripas/Abaca/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Biden administration unveiled its first budget proposal to Congress on Friday, offering a glimpse into President Biden's policy agenda for the 2022 fiscal year.

The big picture: The $1.52 trillion budget proposal outlines top-line figures for Biden's major priorities, though it will ultimately be up to Congress to begin the lengthy appropriations process and allocate funding to federal agencies.

Climate change is a major threat to stability, spy agencies say

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Climate change will lead to a less secure, more crisis-prone world that will strain global institutions, according to a major national security assessment released Thursday.

Driving the news: The “Global Trends Report,” produced every four years by the National Intelligence Council, spotlights climate change among the main structural forces shaping the next two decades.

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