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People walking through a fountain at dusk in Hobroken, New Jersey, on June 29. Photo: Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

Nights on average are heating up faster than days in most parts of the United States — a trend caused by climate change, according to the 2018 National Climate Assessment Report, newly cited by the New York Times.

Why it matters: Last month was the hottest June on record for the U.S., and more than 1,500 areas of the country logged new record-high overnight temperatures toward the end of the month.

Abnormally high nighttime temperatures can increase the risk of heat-related hospitalizations and deaths because prolonged stretches of hot weather prevent people from cooling off from the day’s heat.

  • They can also worsen wildfire conditions because fires typically die down overnight when temperatures dip, the air cools and humidity increases.

What they're saying: “[I]t’s really important that people have an opportunity to bring their core body temperature down,” Kristie Ebi, an environmental health scientist at the University of Washington, told the Times.

  • “When it’s really hot at night, you don’t have that relief and it puts more physiological strain on your body," Ebi added.

How it works: Meteorologists and other scientists believe nights are heating up as temperatures rise throughout the day and the air is able to hold more moisture.

  • They theorize that the increased moisture in the air traps heat close to the ground’s surface, producing warmth that can persist throughout the night.

Go deeper: Pacific Northwest heat wave "virtually impossible" without climate change

Go deeper

Study: Pacific Northwest heat wave "virtually impossible" without climate change

Smoke rises over the mountains in Lytton in British Columbia, as Canadian firefighters battle fires on July 6. Photo: Mert Alper Dervis/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The historic heat wave that struck the Pacific Northwest would have been "virtually impossible without human-caused climate change," an international team of climate researchers said in a new report.

Of note: The World Weather Attribution's analysis, published Wednesday, found that the record-setting heat that triggered wildfires and was linked to hundreds of deaths was a one-in-a-1,000-year event that "would have been at least 150 times rarer without human-induced climate change."

Oregon heat wave deaths hit 116

People rest at the Oregon Convention Center cooling station in Portland, Oregon. Photo: KATHRYN ELSESSER/AFP via Getty Images

The Oregon State Medical Examiner on Wednesday announced that the death toll in the state associated with the late June Pacific Northwest heat wave reached 116.

Details: The new tally provided by the state police does not offer any details to identify the victims other than age, gender and county of residence. The victims' ages range between 37 and 97.

Jul 9, 2021 - Science

Last month was the hottest June on record for the U.S.

People walking in Brooklyn, New York City, on June 30. Photo: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Last month was the hottest June in the United States since consistent record keeping started 127 years ago, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Friday.

Why it matters: The average temperature across the U.S. last month was 72.6°F, and eight states — Arizona, California, Idaho, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Utah — saw their hottest June on record.