Nov 16, 2018

The Weather Channel is bringing mixed reality to sports forecasting

In the pinnacle of football season, The Weather Channel is forecasting football weather in mixed reality to help viewers understand the conditions the players endure at the stadium, shown in their newest mixed reality video exclusively obtained by Axios.

Why it matters: The channel plans to use immersive mixed reality technology in 80% of their programming by 2020 to give their reporting more of a competitive edge.

What they're saying: The Weather Channel has been producing more immersive mixed reality videos to report a more realistic way viewers can see weather in action, Michael Chesterfield, Director of Weather Presentation at The Weather Channel, tells Axios.

The technology from Future Group, called "immersive mixed reality," takes viewers inside of a storm environment for a better forecast rather than just a map with a temperature gauge, Chesterfield said.

  • The video features meteorologist Stephanie Abrams and former Vanderbilt quarterback Jordan Rodgers using the technology to depict how rainy, windy and sleety conditions can affect plays on the turf.
  • Some pro football stadiums have domes that lock out the outdoor elements, but a majority of the stadiums nationwide still host games outside.

Between the lines: In March, Entertainment Studios bought The Weather Channel's TV operation. Its reach 0f 80 million U.S. homes is adapting new means of programming, The Wall Street Journal reports.

  • In September, The Weather Channel released a mixed reality video that went viral, to show how dangerous it would be if residents did not evacuate who due to the storm surge from Hurricane Florence.
  • The channel has also produced a wildfire overtaking a field and the impact of a tornado.

What's next: By early 2019, Chesterfield said the channel wants to produce weather time lapses in mixed reality.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 857,487 — Total deaths: 42,107 — Total recoveries: 178,034.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in confirmed cases. Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 188,172 — Total deaths: 3,873 — Total recoveries: 7,024.
  3. Business updates: Should you pay your rent or mortgage during the coronavirus pandemic? Find out if you are protected under the CARES Act.
  4. Public health updates: More than 400 long-term care facilities across the U.S. report patients with coronavirus — Older adults and people with underlying health conditions are more at risk, new data shows.
  5. Federal government latest: President Trump said the next two weeks would be "very painful," with projections indicating the virus could kill 100,000–240,000 Americans.
  6. U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt: Captain of nuclear aircraft carrier docked in Guam pleaded with the U.S. Navy for more resources after more than 100 members of his crew tested positive.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

The novel coronavirus pandemic is the "greatest test" the world has faced together since the formation of the United Nations just after the Second World War ended in 1945, UN chief António Guterres said Tuesday.

The big picture: COVID-19 cases surged past 856,000 and the death toll exceeded 42,000 Tuesday, per Johns Hopkins data. Italy reported more than 12,000 deaths.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 hours ago - Health

White House projects 100,000 to 240,000 U.S. coronavirus deaths

President Trump said at a press briefing on Tuesday that the next two weeks in the U.S. will be "very painful" and that he wants "every American to be prepared for the days that lie ahead," before giving way to Deborah Birx to explain the models informing the White House's new guidance on the coronavirus.

Why it matters: It's a somber new tone from the president that comes after his medical advisers showed him data projecting that the virus could kill 100,000–240,000 Americans — even with strict social distancing guidelines in place.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 3 hours ago - Health