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Protesters in New York carrying a Colin Kaepernick sign. Photo: Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

For the first time, a majority of Americans support NFL players kneeling in protest of racial inequality, according to the results of a Yahoo News/YouGov poll released Thursday.

Why it matters: Public sentiment had been rooted firmly in opposition to kneeling during the national anthem since Colin Kaepernick first took a knee in 2016. But in the wake of nationwide protests supporting Black Lives Matter, the tide has shifted in the other direction.

The backdrop: In 2016, only 28% of Americans considered Kaepernick's actions "appropriate." In 2018 — when President Trump attacked players on Twitter for kneeling — that number rose to 35%.

By the numbers: The poll, which ran June 9–10, asked if it's "OK for NFL players to kneel during the national anthem to protest police killings of African Americans?” Just 36% of respondents disapproved.

  • Male (52%) and female (52%) respondents deemed this form of protest appropriate, with the younger respondents (18–29) leading the charge at 68%.
  • 77% of self-described Democrats agreed, in contrast to 20% of Republicans and 20% of Trump voters.
  • 77% of black people, 57% of Hispanics and 47% of white people answered in the affirmative.

Methodology, per Yahoo: "The poll of 1,570 Americans was conducted June 9 and 10 and covered a range of topics, including police brutality, racial injustice and presidential evaluation."

Go deeper

SurveyMonkey poll: Suburbs and the safety wedge

Data: SurveyMonkey poll of 35,732 U.S. adults conducted Aug. 31 to Sept. 6, 2020 with ±1% margin of error; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

White suburbanites who feel "very safe" in their communities are more likely to favor Joe Biden, while those who feel only somewhat safe move toward President Trump, according to new SurveyMonkey polling for Axios.

Why it matters: The findings help illuminate how Trump is using safety as a wedge issue ahead of the election — and why he's fanning fears of violent protests bleeding into the suburbs.

Updated 43 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Dave Lawler, author of World
57 mins ago - World

Biden holds first phone call with Putin, raises Navalny arrest

Putin takes a call in 2017. Photo: Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty

President Biden on Tuesday held his first call since taking office with Vladimir Putin, pressing the Russian president on the arrest of opposition leader Alexey Navalny and the Russia-linked hack on U.S. government agencies, AP reports.

The state of play: Biden also planned to raise arms control, bounties allegedly placed on U.S. troops in Afghanistan and the war in Ukraine, according to White House press secretary Jen Psaki, who said the call took place while she was delivering a press briefing. Psaki added that a full readout will be provided later Tuesday.