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The next social media hearings may be about gun violence

Senator Lindsey Graham talks to reporters
Sen. Lindsey Graham says he's worried about threats of gun violence online. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham (S.C.) says he'd like to grill America's social media companies at a hearing about the way threats of gun violence, including against schools, spread online.

Why it matters: Social media can be a potent vehicle for threats of violence. Earlier this week schools in Bayonne, N.J. shut down after threats of a school shooting appeared on social media.

The details: “I think we need another one about the gun stuff," Graham told Axios when asked about calls for another hearing with the social media firms. He said "we need to go back and look at postings threatening people."

  • He held a hearing on social media and Russian election interference last year through the subcommittee he chairs within the Judiciary Committee.
  • Louisiana Sen. John Kennedy has said he wants the chief executives of major social media companies to testify before Graham's subcommittee. Graham said he doesn't care who the companies send on the gun issue.
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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Axios' Stef Kight.

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 2 hours ago
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America's delayed backlash to globalization

Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping.
Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping. Photo: Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

The backlash to globalization is coming "at exactly the wrong time," the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: President Trump's new tariffs, on steel and aluminum and most recently against China, are working to "re-set the terms of the global economy," the NYT reports. But the globalization the world is seeing today is not focused on goods and services, but "greater connectivity and communication."