SaveSave story

News orgs solicit anonymous tips amid Comey firing

In response to the unexpected firing of FBI Director James Comey Tuesday, major news organizations tweeted out links to secure hotlines where anyone with knowledge of information around the controversy could anonymously submit tips. They include the New Yorker, Washington Post, USA Today, Wired, Vice and more.

Here's why: The abrupt firing of Comey is likely to raise concerns with many officials, perhaps even some in the White House, and could prompt them to leak information to the press. A plethora of leaks since Trump's election shows the administration is not united behind many of the president's decisions.

The trend: News organizations have been promoting anonymous tip hotlines since Trump took office and leaks from his Administration started to become more frequent. Gizmodo bought ads earlier this year, targeted at government employees, to get them to submit anonymous tips.

Here are a list of all news organizations with Secure Drop accounts:

Mike Allen 26 mins ago
SaveSave story

Why Trump added a streetfighter to his legal team

Screenshot via Fox News

A new addition to President Trump's legal team — Joe diGenova, a former U.S. attorney who is well-known in Washington and has argued for the president on Fox News — reflects three White House realities.

The state of play: (1) The White House is digging in for a fight that looks to be longer and messier than officials had expected. (2) This is another example of the president responding to televised cues. Trump has spent most of his adult life in litigation, and obsesses about legal positioning in the same way that he is consumed by his press coverage. (3) It's another pugilistic voice at the table, and suggests that this weekend's attacks on Mueller won't be the last.

SaveSave story

Facebook reaches a tipping point

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios 

Of all the news crises Facebook has faced during the past year, the Cambridge Analytica scandal is playing out to be the worst and most damaging.

Why it matters: It's not that the reports reveal anything particularly new about how Facebook's back end works — developers have understood the vulnerabilities of Facebook's interface for years. But stakeholders crucial to the company's success — as well as the public seem less willing to listen to its side of the story this time around.