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New York Mayor Bill de Blasio. Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images

New York City's coronavirus positivity rate has ticked up to 3.25%, its highest since June, Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The jump — from 1.93% on Monday — came on the first day that public elementary classrooms reopened in the city after months of closures, but guidelines state that all public schools will have to shut if the citywide seven-day positivity rate stays above 3%.

  • It also comes as New York will attempt to reintroduce indoor dining in a limited capacity this week.
  • "That is cause for real concern," de Blasio said.

The big picture: A number of the spikes happened in Orthodox Jewish communities in South Brooklyn and Queens, per the New York Times.

  • City officials have threatened to introduce more severe localized lockdown measures, including restricting gatherings of more than 10 people, if outbreaks continue to occur.

Go deeper

Fauci sees greater China role in COVID-19 spread, one year on

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Ira L. Black (Corbis), Pool/Getty Images

A lack of transparency by Chinese officials — particularly about the novel coronavirus' transmission and the obstruction of a top U.S. scientist from investigating it — played a significant role in allowing COVID-19 to spread outside China, NIAID director Anthony Fauci tells Axios.

The big picture: Axios first spoke with Fauci one year ago this week about the "mysterious pneumonia" in Wuhan, China, which he suspected was a novel coronavirus but was being reported by Chinese health officials as not that infectious.

Schumer: First priority in new Senate is $2,000 stimulus checks

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) talks with reporters in the Capitol on Jan. 3. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Wednesday that one of his first priorities in the 117th Senate will be to pass legislation that would send $2000 stimulus payments.

Why it matters: If Jon Ossoff holds his lead over former Sen. Perdue, Schumer is set to become the next majority leader with the power to steer legislation. The election has not yet been called.

Congressman announces positive COVID-19 test just hours after House floor vote

Rep. Jake LaTurner. Photo: Mark Reinstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Newly elected Rep. Jake LaTurner (R-Kansas) has tested positive for COVID-19 and is following CDC guidelines but is not experiencing any symptoms, per a statement from his office on Thursday morning.

Why it matters: LaTurner voted on the Arizona objection in the Electoral College certification process on Wednesday night, records show. He took the test as part of Washington, D.C'.s requirements and "does not plan to return to the House floor for votes until he is cleared to do so," per the statement.