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Terrafugia's Transition, a plane you can drive on roads and park in your garage. Photo: Terrafugia

New Hampshire is touting itself as the first state in the country to authorize flying cars, which is a bit of an overstatement.

Why it matters: The bill signed by Gov. Chris Sununu, dubbed "the Jetson law," makes it legal for "roadable aircraft" to drive on the state's roads.

  • That's not the same as authorizing urban air taxis to fly above those same roadways, something only the Federal Aviation Administration can do, and remains a long way off.

Yes, but: It's still an interesting development on the road to future mobility.

  • It applies to small planes that can also be driven as cars.
  • A handful of companies are working on such flexible aircraft, including Terrafugia, Samson Sky and PAL-V.
  • The law allows pilots to drive these aircraft to and from airports but prohibits landing or taking off on public roads.
  • Terrafugia and PAL-V both have operations in New Hampshire, and all three companies helped shape the legislation.

How it works: Terrafugia's Transition, for example, seats two and converts from drive mode to flight mode in less than a minute by pushing a button.

  • It runs on automotive grade gasoline and the wings fold inward so it can be parked in your garage instead of an airport hangar.

Go deeper

Scoop: Trump tells confidants he plans to pardon Michael Flynn

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

President Trump has told confidants he plans to pardon his former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to the FBI about his Russian contacts, two sources with direct knowledge of the discussions tell Axios.

Behind the scenes: Sources with direct knowledge of the discussions said Flynn will be part of a series of pardons that Trump issues between now and when he leaves office.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
4 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

Trump gives Biden access to presidential intelligence briefings

Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The Trump White House on Tuesday gave President-elect Biden access to daily presidential intelligence briefings, a source familiar with the matter tells Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has refused to share the briefs until now, as he continues to challenge the result of the election and declines to concede. The president's acquiescence comes as another sign that the transition to a Biden administration is taking place.