Updated Apr 21, 2018

Juiciest excerpts from new book on Hillary Clinton campaign

Hillary Clinton making her concession speech. Photo: Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

Amy Chozick's new book "Chasing Hillary" is already making news around town with new details about Hillary Clinton's campaign falling under the microscope in the days before its release.

"I knew it. I knew this would happen to me ... They were never going to let me be president."
— Hillary Clinton, per a quote from the book.

Basket of deplorable tiers: Clinton commonly referred to Trump supporters as deplorables in three tiers, Chozick writes:

    • Basket #1: The Republicans who hated her and would vote Republican no matter who the nominee."
    • "Basket #2: Voters whose jobs and livelihoods had disappeared..."
    • "Basket #3: The Deplorables. This basket includes ‘the racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic — you name it." (Daily Beast)

Joe Biden wanted to run for president but feared the Clintons would try and "destroy" him. Chozick writes “he added something like ‘You guys don’t understand these people.'" (Daily Beast)

Chozick blamed Clinton for ignoring media and not recognizing how Trump used journalists: “Trump understood our gluttonous short attention span better than anyone,” she wrote, “but especially better than Hillary.” (Washington Post)

Clinton knew she had a likability problem but Chozick said she "cut off" staff members who brought it to her attention. “You know, I am getting pretty tired of hearing about how nobody likes me." (Daily Beast)

"I Became an Unwitting Agent of Russian Intelligence" is the title of one of the chapters in the book where Chozick details her sympathy about the Clinton e-mail scandal story. (Washington Post)

What's next: The book detailing Clinton's campaign, her strategies and what happened after she lost the election will hit shelves on April 24.

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U.S. coronavirus updates: Death toll nears 11,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Recorded deaths from the novel coronavirus surpassed 10,900 in the U.S. early Tuesday, per Johns Hopkins data. More than 1,000 people in the U.S. have died of coronavirus-related conditions each day since April 1.

Why it matters: U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams said on Sunday this week will be "the hardest and saddest week of most Americans' lives" — calling it our "our Pearl Harbor, our 9/11 moment."

Go deeperArrowUpdated 40 mins ago - Health

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 p.m. ET: 1,347,803 — Total deaths: 74,807 — Total recoveries: 277,402Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 p.m. ET: 368,196 — Total deaths: 10,986 — Total recoveries: 19,828Map.
  3. Trump administration latest: President Trump's economic adviser Peter Navarro warned White House colleagues in late January the coronavirus could take over half a million American lives and cost close to $6 trillion, memos obtained by Axios show.
  4. 2020 update: Wisconsin Supreme Court blocks governor's attempt to delay in-person primary voting delayed until June.
  5. States latest: West Coast states send ventilators to New York and other states with more immediate need — Data suggest coronavirus curve may be flattening in New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.
  6. World update: U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson moved to intensive care as coronavirus symptoms worsen.
  7. Stocks latest: The S&P 500 closed up 7% on Monday, while the Dow rose more than 1,500 points.
  8. What should I do? Pets, moving and personal health. Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

Subscribe to Mike Allen's Axios AM to follow our coronavirus coverage each morning from your inbox.

Docs: Navarro memos warning mass death circulated West Wing in January

Image from a memo to President Trump

In late January, President Trump's economic adviser Peter Navarro warned his White House colleagues the novel coronavirus could take more than half a million American lives and cost close to $6 trillion, according to memos obtained by Axios.

  • By late February, Navarro was even more alarmed, and he warned his colleagues, in another memo, that up to two million Americans could die of the virus.

Driving the news: Navarro's grim estimates are set out in two memos — one dated Jan. 29 and addressed to the National Security Council, the other dated Feb. 23 and addressed to the president. The NSC circulated both memos around the White House and multiple agencies.

Go deeperArrow2 hours ago - Health