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Photo: Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

A glitch in software designed by Netflix in 2013, used in early versions of Google Chromecast and installed in several mid-decade televisions and other devices would allow an attacker to crash a TV, according to new research from security firm ForAllSecure.

The big picture: Netflix's DIAL software allowed people to broadcast video from a phone or computer onto their television and was an early component of Chromecast until Google moved that software in a different direction. Though the software is now obsolete, many TVs came preinstalled with DIAL.

The discovery was made by 2 interns at ForAllSecure completing an assignment to use the company's Mayhem automated security analysis software to analyze open source software.

  • The interns turned the glitches over to Netflix through a "bug bounty" program, where Netflix offers cash rewards to researchers who uncover security flaws in its products. Netflix has now patched the bug.
  • The interns will get to keep the bounty, co-founder and CEO David Brumley told Axios.
    • “You’ve got to motivate interns to stay in security somehow,” he said.

Details: The DIAL glitch comes from an error in how data is stored in computer memory in a modified version of a coding library known as Mongoose.

  • It’s not immediately clear if the glitch affects other products using Mongoose around the same time, noted Brumley.

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
3 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

Trump gives Biden access to presidential intelligence briefings

Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The Trump White House on Tuesday gave President-elect Biden access to daily presidential intelligence briefings, a source familiar with the matter tells Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has refused to share the briefs until now, as he continues to challenge the result of the election and declines to concede. The president's acquiescence comes as another sign that the transition to a Biden administration is taking place.

AOC and Ilhan Omar want to block Biden’s former chief of staff

Reps. Ilhan Omar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images

Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar are boosting a petition against Joe Biden nominating his former chief of staff to a new role in his administration, calling Bruce Reed a "deficit hawk” and criticizing his past support for Social Security and Medicare cuts.

Why it matters: Progressives are mounting their pressure campaign after the president-elect did not include any of their favored candidates in his first slate of Cabinet nominees, and they are serious about installing some of their allies, blocking anyone who doesn't pass their smell test — and making noise if they are not heard.