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Data: YCharts; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Netflix will bleed more cash this year than analysts expected, but the payoff won’t be more subscribers.

Driving the news: In its earnings report, Netflix said it expects its free cash flow deficit to be $3.5 billion this year — more than the $3 billion loss it previously estimated (the company says it's because of a change in corporate structure and investments in real estate and infrastructure).

  • Netflix also dialed back its expectations for subscriber growth, "anticipating a net add of 5 million paid subscribers for the second quarter," which is below Wall Street’s expectations for 6.09 million new paid members, as Axios’ Sara Fischer reports.
  • CEO Reed Hastings said last quarter that this year would be the peak for cash burn: "We’re still expecting free cash flow to improve in 2020 and each year thereafter, driven by our growing member base, revenues, and operating margins."

Why it matters: Wall Street has given Netflix’s cash burn a pass. The spend on content usually translates into more subscribers driven to the platform for said content. But investors’ knee jerk reaction was to sell the stock after its less-than-stellar guidance.

  • The stock rebounded after initially falling as much as 5% after the bell on Tuesday.

What to watch: With the launch of Disney+, viewers have yet another, cheaper option. This isn't lost on investors. Analysts, however, point out that streaming is not necessarily a zero sum game.

  • Of note: In the face of the heightened competition, Netflix is raising — not cutting — its monthly cost.

Go deeper: The revenue battles of Big Media vs. Netflix

Go deeper

10 hours ago - Health

15 states broke single-day coronavirus records this week

Data: Compiled from state health departments by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

At least 15 states broke their single-day novel coronavirus infection records this week, according to state health department data reviewed by Axios.

The big picture: The number of coronavirus cases increased in the vast majority of states over the last week, and decreased in only two states plus the District of Columbia, Axios' Andrew Withershoop and Caitlin Owens report.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 11,143,945 — Total deaths: 527,681 — Total recoveries — 6,004,593Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 2,818,588 — Total deaths: 129,584 — Total recoveries: 883,561 — Total tested: 34,213,497Map.
  3. States: Photos of America's pandemic July 4 ICU beds in Arizona's hot spot reach near capacity.
  4. Public health: U.S. coronavirus infections hit record highs for 3 straight days.
  5. Politics: Trump extends PPP application deadlineKimberly Guilfoyle tests positive.
  6. World: Mexican leaders call for tighter border control as infections rise in U.S.
  7. Sports: 31 MLB players test positive as workouts resume.
  8. 1 📽 thing: Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback.
10 hours ago - Health

In photos: America celebrates July 4 during global pandemic

Photo: Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

The U.S. has already celebrated Easter, graduations and so much more during the coronavirus pandemic, and now it can add July 4 to the list.

The state of play: Axios' Stef Kight writes public parades and fireworks displays around much of the country are being canceled to prevent mass gatherings where the virus could spread. Hot-dog contests and concerts will play to empty stands and virtual audiences — all while American pride treads an all-time low.