10 Downing Street. Photo: Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Neil Ferguson, one of the U.K.'s most prominent epidemiologists working on coronavirus response, resigned Tuesday after breaking lockdown rules to have a woman visit him at home, the Telegraph first reported.

The big picture: Models produced by Ferguson and his team at Imperial College London warned that 250,000 people could die from the coronavirus in the U.K. unless the government took drastic action to stem the spread. The projections ultimately contributed to Prime Minister Boris Johnson's decision to lock down the country after initially ruling against it.

What he's saying: Ferguson told the Telegraph Tuesday that he felt he had undermined his own public calls for social distancing.

  • “I accept I made an error of judgment and took the wrong course of action. I have therefore stepped back from my involvement in SAGE [Strategic Advisory Group of Experts]."
  • “I acted in the belief that I was immune, having tested positive for coronavirus and completely isolated myself for almost two weeks after developing symptoms."
  • “I deeply regret any undermining of the clear messages around the continued need for social distancing to control this devastating epidemic. The government guidance is unequivocal, and is there to protect all of us.”

Go deeper

2 mins ago - Technology

TikTok responds to Trump executive order: "We are shocked"

Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

TikTok said Friday that it was "shocked" by President Trump's executive order that will ban Americans from dealing with ByteDance, its China-based owner, in 45 days.

Why it matters: TikTok argued that Trump's move "risks undermining global businesses' trust in the United States' commitment to the rule of law, which has served as a magnet for investment and spurred decades of American economic growth."

U.S. economy adds 1.8 million jobs in July

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. added 1.8 million jobs last month, while the unemployment rate fell to 10.2% from 11.1% in June, the Labor Department said on Friday.

Why it matters: The labor market continued to recover but the pace of job growth slowed significantly from June’s 4.8 million job gain, suggesting a stalled recovery as coronavirus cases surged and states pulled back on reopening plans.

45 mins ago - Sports

The pandemic's impact on how sports are played

Damian Lillard shoots a free throw during one of the NBA's restart games. Photo: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

Sports are back, and on the surface, the actual gameplay looks fairly similar to when we last saw them.

But beneath that facade of normalcy lie some interesting trends spurred on by fan-less environments, long layoffs and condensed schedules.