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NCAA president Mark Emmert. Photo: Maxx Wolfson/Getty Images

NCAA president Mark Emmert told the New York Times this week that he would recommend that the college sports' governing body approve new rules that would allow student athletes to profit from their names, images and likenesses "before, or as close to July 1."

Driving the news: New laws that let student athletes in some way profit off their names, images or likenesses are set to take effect in Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and New Mexico on July 1. Other states have passed similar laws that are scheduled to take effect next year.

The state of play: The NCAA is considering a proposal that would allow student athletes to earn money for social media endorsements and to get paid by many private companies who use their names, images and likenesses, per the Times. Some restrictions would apply.

  • The NCAA postponed a vote on the proposal in January after the Trump administration raised antitrust concerns, the Times reported.
  • Emmert told the Times that NCAA officials have been in touch with the Justice Department about the concerns. “We need to get a vote on these rules that are in front of the members now,” Emmert said.
  • If approved, the new rules could take effect Aug. 1.

But, but, but: Even if the NCAA approves the new rules, the NIL debate is expected to rage on since the proposed guidelines "differ in some respects from the new state laws, which themselves are far from uniform," the Times noted.

  • Some NCAA officials "have urged Congress to set a coast-to-coast standard to override a blur of state laws," the Times added.

Go deeper: The fleeting facade of amateurism in college sports

Go deeper

Olympic athletes see more sponsorship opportunities

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Tokyo 2020 athletes are cashing in on more personal sponsorship opportunities compared with past Games.

Why it matters: Marketing deals are an important income stream for competitors, nearly 60% of whom say they are not financially stable. 

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Investors pour millions into immersive, interactive art experiences

Photo Illustration: Megan Robinson/Axios. Photo: Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images

How much would you pay for "a sleek, if pleasantly confusing, package of moods" or "a confusing tangle of disjointed installations" or even "the total erosion of meaning itself"? The answer, according to the current market-clearing price, seems to be about $35.

Why it matters: Investors are pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into ticketed experiences — immersive, interactive museum-like spaces that don't have the d0-not-touch stuffiness of traditional museums.

Special Envoy for Haiti resigns over Biden deportations

Daniel Foote testifies during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on May 26, 2016. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Special Envoy for Haiti on Wednesday resigned from his position, writing in his resignation letter obtained by PBS that he "will not be associated with the United States inhumane, counterproductive decision to deport thousands of Haitian refugees."

Why it matters: Ambassador Daniel Foote's resignation comes amid heightened anger over the treatment of Haitian migrants and asylum-seekers living in a temporary encampment in Del Rio, Texas — especially after images surfaced of Border Patrol agents whipping at the migrants from horseback.

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