Apr 17, 2019

NCAA to vote on rule limiting early recruiting

Photo: Jeffrey Brown/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Elite young athletes are being offered college scholarships as early as middle school, and because many of those offers come with a "take it or leave it" deadline, teenagers often make rash decisions. That could change this week.

What's happening: The NCAA Division I Council will vote on a proposal on Thursday, April 17 that would ban all recruiting contact between coaches and athletes until June 15 of the student's sophomore year of high school.

One caveat: Football, basketball, baseball and ice hockey would be excluded from the new rules to allow athletes to weigh scholarships against professional contracts. Those are also the sports where early recruiting happens the most.

  • Lacrosse and softball are also asking to be excluded because they already have their own rules that are even more stringent (recruiting is prohibited until Sept. 1 of a student's junior year).

The bottom line, via Karen Weekly, the co-head softball coach at the University of Tennessee: "Ten years ago, we thought sophomores committing was too young. Sixth graders? Enough is enough."

Go deeper: How NCAA conferences earn money from March Madness

Go deeper

Debate night: Candidates' last face-off before Super Tuesday

Sanders, Biden, Klobuchar and Steyer in South Carolina on Feb. 25. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders wants to keep his momentum after winning New Hampshire and Nevada, while former Vice President Joe Biden hopes to keep his own campaign alive. The other five candidates are just trying to hang on.

What's happening: Seven contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination are in Charleston, South Carolina, for the tenth debate, just days before the South Carolina primary and a week before Super Tuesday. They're talking about health care, Russian interference in the election, the economy and race.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 3 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Sanders to Putin: You won't interfere in any more elections if I'm president

Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images.

Sen. Bernie Sanders sent a message to Russian President Vladimir Putin on the debate stage Tuesday, stating, "If I'm president of the United States, trust me, you're not going to interfere in any more American elections."

The big picture: It was unveiled last week that Russia has been interfering to boost Sanders' campaigns in an apparent attempt to strengthen President Trump's bid for reelection. Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that "Vladimir Putin thinks that Donald Trump should be president of the United States, and that's why Russia is helping [Sanders] get elected.

Axios Dashboard

Keep up with breaking news throughout the day — sign up for our alerts.