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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It's not just goods and services that cross international borders every day — it's people, too. But now the world is retreating into national shells, and the U.S. is leading the way in discouraging international travel.

Driving the news: In recent days, the U.S. has banned foreigners from entering the U.S. if they have been in China within the past 2 weeks.

  • It also imposed travel restrictions on citizens of Eritrea, Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar, Nigeria, Sudan and Tanzania — who between them have a population of more than 360 million.
  • And it barred even U.S. citizens from enrolling in the Global Entry program that facilitates international travel, if they live in the state of New York.

Of note: This was roughly the same week that the U.K. left the EU, with seismic implications for the future of labor mobility both into and out of Great Britain.

How it works: If you've ever spent much time in a place with invisible international borders, you'll know how magical it feels. In places like Alsace, or the island of Ireland, hard borders mean war and bloodshed, while their absence means peace and prosperity.

How it fails: International trade is already suffering from the coronavirus, including the travel and tourism sector. In the present climate, it's harder than ever for companies and countries to reverse course and start rebuilding severed international links.

The big picture: Coronavirus may only be a short-term problem. Over the long term, however, the outlook is similarly bleak, thanks to the geopolitical consequences of global warming.

  • A case can be made that the climate crisis caused Brexit. The British vote to leave the EU was in part a reaction to the sight of Germany accepting hundreds of thousands of refugees from the war in Syria. That war, in turn, was exacerbated, if not caused, by global warming.

The bottom line: When international travel and migration starts to decline, that's a bad sign for everybody except nationalists.

Go deeper: The global economic threat of the coronavirus

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

U.S. surpasses 25 million COVID cases

A mass COVID-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium on Jan. 22 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The U.S has confirmed more than 25 million coronavirus cases, per Johns Hopkins data updated on Sunday.

The big picture: President Biden has said he expects the country's death toll to exceed 500,000 people by next month, as the rate of deaths due to the virus continues to escalate.

GOP implosion: Trump threats, payback

Spotted last week on a work van in Evansville, Ind. Photo: Sam Owens/The Evansville Courier & Press via Reuters

The GOP is getting torn apart by a spreading revolt against party leaders for failing to stand up for former President Trump and punish his critics.

Why it matters: Republican leaders suffered a nightmarish two months in Washington. Outside the nation’s capital, it's even worse.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
6 hours ago - Economy & Business

The limits of Biden's plan to cancel student debt

Data: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax; Chart: Axios Visuals

There’s a growing consensus among Americans who want President Biden to cancel student debt — but addressing the ballooning debt burden is much more complicated than it seems.

Why it matters: Student debt is stopping millions of Americans from buying homes, buying cars and starting families. And the crisis is rapidly getting worse.