Sep 27, 2019

300+ former national security officials condemn Trump-Ukraine actions

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

More than 300 former national security officials have signed a letter supporting the impeachment inquiry into President Trump on allegations he pressured Ukraine.

"President Trump appears to have leveraged the authority and the resources of the highest office in the land to invite additional foreign interference into our democratic processes. That would constitute an unconscionable abuse of power. It also would represent an effort to subordinate America's national interests — and those of our closes allies and partners — to the President's personal political interest."
— Letter from the National Security Action

What they're saying: "The revelations of recent days, however, demand a response. Specifically, all of us recognize the imperative of formal impeachment proceedings to ascertain additional facts and weigh the consequences of what we have learned and what may yet still emerge. We applaud those Members of Congress, including Speaker Pelosi, who have no started us down the necessary path."

  • The letter is signed by former officials who worked under both Democratic and Republican administrations.

That list includes:

  • William Burns — Former Deputy Secretary of State
  • Nancy McEldowney — Former U.S. ambassador
  • Jeffrey Feltman — Former Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs

Worth noting: The letter was put together by National Security Action, which mostly consists of of national security officials from the Obama administration. They often release statements similar to this one about the Trump administration.

Go deeper: The call heard 'round the world

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The coming appearances in House Democrats' impeachment probe

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The three House committees investigating President Trump and Ukraine have sent multiple letters to key Trump administration officials demanding they appear as part of Democrats' rapidly expanding impeachment inquiry.

The latest: Trump’s former national security adviser John Bolton was asked on Wednesday to testify before House impeachment committees on Nov. 7. The top lawyer on the national security council John Eisenberg and his deputy Michael Ellis were also asked on to testify on Nov. 4. It is unclear whether any will show up.

The coming schedule ArrowUpdated Oct 30, 2019

House Democrats subpoena White House in impeachment inquiry

Mick Mulvaney. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

House committees leading the impeachment inquiry against President Trump subpoenaed acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney on Friday.

The big picture: This comes after nearly a month of White House refusals to comply with House investigations into whether Trump jeopardized national security by pressing Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 presidential election, and by withholding security assistance provided by Congress to help Ukraine, per the subpoena. The committees are demanding documents by Oct. 18.

Go deeperArrowOct 4, 2019

House chairmen suggest Pompeo conflict of interest

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The chairs of the House Foreign Affairs, Intelligence and Oversight committees said in a letter Tuesday that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo "appears to have an obvious conflict of interest" over President Trump's impeachment inquiry. And they warn that Pompeo may be in violation of the law if he tries to prevent staff from testifying.

Why it matters: The letter to Deputy Secretary of State John Sullivan is the latest escalation in a war of words between Pompeo and these House committees probing the Trump administration's alleged efforts to pressure Ukraine to investigate 2020 candidate Joe Biden.

Go deeperArrowOct 2, 2019