Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

More than 300 former national security officials have signed a letter supporting the impeachment inquiry into President Trump on allegations he pressured Ukraine.

"President Trump appears to have leveraged the authority and the resources of the highest office in the land to invite additional foreign interference into our democratic processes. That would constitute an unconscionable abuse of power. It also would represent an effort to subordinate America's national interests — and those of our closes allies and partners — to the President's personal political interest."
— Letter from the National Security Action

What they're saying: "The revelations of recent days, however, demand a response. Specifically, all of us recognize the imperative of formal impeachment proceedings to ascertain additional facts and weigh the consequences of what we have learned and what may yet still emerge. We applaud those Members of Congress, including Speaker Pelosi, who have no started us down the necessary path."

  • The letter is signed by former officials who worked under both Democratic and Republican administrations.

That list includes:

  • William Burns — Former Deputy Secretary of State
  • Nancy McEldowney — Former U.S. ambassador
  • Jeffrey Feltman — Former Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs

Worth noting: The letter was put together by National Security Action, which mostly consists of of national security officials from the Obama administration. They often release statements similar to this one about the Trump administration.

Go deeper: The call heard 'round the world

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