Photo: Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The National Park Service will temporarily suspend entrance fees at all parks that remain open during the coronavirus crisis, Interior Secretary David Bernhardt announced Wednesday.

What he's saying: National parks across the country will help "to recreate, embrace nature and implement some social distancing," Bernhardt said in a press release.

  • "This small step makes it a little easier for the American public to enjoy the outdoors," he continued.

Of note: A number of parks have closed in an effort to halt the spread of the coronavirus. But a majority of the ones in which it's possible to adhere to CDC guidances on social distancing are still open, according to the NPS release.

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Updated Jun 25, 2020 - Health

Texas pauses its reopening as coronavirus cases surge

Customers sit outside on the patio at Eight Row Flint in Houston on May 22. Photo: Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Texas is pausing its phased economic reopening in an effort to battle the state's surging coronavirus outbreak, Gov. Greg Abbott (R) announced Thursday.

The state of play: Abbott said the move "will help our state corral the spread until we can safely enter the next phase," but allowed businesses — including restaurants and bars — already open under the state's guidelines to remain in operation.

Updated 9 hours ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

South Carolina restaurants and bars will have to close alcohol sales by 11 p.m., beginning Saturday, under an order issued Friday by Gov. Henry McMaster.

The big picture: The U.S. had another record single-day spike of 63,200 new coronavirus cases from Thursday. COVID-19 cases in South Carolina have increased, with 21,560 cases recorded in the last two weeks.

Cities put major construction projects on hold as coronavirus budget crunch looms

Construction workers wearing masks work on a road in New York City in May. Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Major infrastructure projects have been put on ice, economic development programs are getting the ax, and workers are losing their jobs.

Why it matters: These are the realities for localities dealing with multimillion-dollar budget holes while also continuing to pour money into COVID-19 response as cases spike.