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Rep. Jerry Nadler at a New York City press conference on June 2. Photo: Scott Heins/Getty Images

House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) announced on Tuesday that Justice Department whistleblowers and former agency officials are expected to testify on what he deemed "the unprecedented politicization" of the DOJ under Attorney General Bill Barr and President Trump.

Driving the news: Nadler listed Barr walking with Trump and other administration officials to Washington, D.C.'s historic St. John’s Episcopal Church on Monday as an example of Barr's "unacceptable" behavior. The photo op was made possible by military police and park rangers using tear gas and physical force on peaceful protestors to clear the area.

  • Nadler said that he would introduce legislation to slash the DOJ's budget by $50 million.
  • Nadler attributed the proposed funding cuts and oversight to the DOJ's decision to drop its prosecution of former national security adviser Michael Flynn and Barr's refusal to testify due to the coronavirus pandemic.

What they're saying: “I am not going to spend months litigating a subpoena with an Attorney General who has already spent years resisting the courts and legitimate congressional oversight—but neither will we stand by and allow Mr. Barr to continue to corrupt the Department," Nadler said in a press release on Tuesday. "We do not take these actions lightly or with any sense of joy. We have both a duty and a moral obligation to protect the rule of law in our country, and we intend to do just that."

  • In response to Monday's protests in D.C., Barr said in a statement on Tuesday: "There will be even greater law enforcement resources and support in the region tonight. The most basic function of government is to provide security for people to live their lives and exercise their rights, and we will meet that responsibility here in the nation’s capital.” Barr said Monday's protests were "a more peaceful night in the District of Columbia."

Go deeper: Trump goes full law-and-order

Go deeper

DOJ moves to defend Trump in rape accuser E. Jean Carroll's defamation lawsuit

Combination images of E. Jean Carroll and President Trump. Photo: Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Glamour/Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Department of Justice filed a motion notifying a New York State court Tuesday that it intends to replace President Trump's private lawyers to defend him in a defamation lawsuit brought by writer E. Jean Carroll.

Why it matters: It's highly unusual for the DOJ to intervene in such cases. The department said in its notice that it intervened because Trump was "acting within the scope of his office as President of the United States" when he said last year that Carroll was "totally lying" about claims that he raped her in the mid-1990s.

Congress plots COVID pandemic-era office upgrades

oving crates outside Rep. Elise Stefanik's old office Tuesday. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The House plans to renovate members' suites even though staff are worried about an influx of contractors and D.C. is tightening restrictions on large gatherings, some staffers told Axios.

Why it matters: The Capitol has been closed to public tours since March. Work over the holiday season comes as U.S. coronavirus cases spike, Americans beg for more pandemic assistance and food lines grow.

Trump pressures Barr to release so-called Durham report

Bill Barr. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump and his allies are piling extreme pressure on Attorney General Bill Barr to release a report that Trump believes could hurt perceived Obama-era enemies — and view Barr's designation of John Durham as special counsel as a stall tactic, sources familiar with the conversations tell Axios.

Why it matters: Speculation over Barr's fate grew on Tuesday, with just 49 days remaining in Trump's presidency, after Barr gave an interview to the Associated Press in which he said the Justice Department has not uncovered evidence of widespread fraud that could change the election's outcome.