President Trump called some statements provided by witnesses in special counsel Robert Mueller's report "total bullshit" in a series of Friday morning tweets.

"Because I never agreed to testify, it was not necessary for me to respond to statements made in the 'Report' about me, some of which are total bullshit & only given to make the other person look good (or me to look bad)."

The big picture: Trump also tweeted to "watch out for people that take so-called 'notes,'" likely a reference to one of the report's most-reported passages, where the president questioned why then-White House counsel Don McGahn took notes during their conversations.

  • According to details McGahn and others provided to the Mueller's team, Trump had instructed McGahn to contact Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to have Mueller fired. McGahn did not carry out Trump's order.
  • Refusals from McGahn — and other top White House staffers — to obey such presidential directives are part of the reason why Trump ultimately avoided obstruction of justice charges in Mueller's investigation.

Worth noting: According to the report, when Trump learned of Mueller's appointment from then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the president said, "Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my presidency. I'm fucked."

  • That anecdote came from contemporaneous notes provided to Mueller's investigation by Sessions' chief of staff, Jody Hunt.

Go deeper: 7 takeaways from the Mueller report

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
36 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The new politics of global warming

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Getty Images photos: Ethan Miller and Chip Somodevilla

The 2020 election is both very different and very familiar when it comes to the politics of global warming and the stakes of the outcome.

What's new: Democratic voters are more concerned than in prior presidential cycles, polling shows.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
41 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Pinpointing climate change's role in extreme weather

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Getty Images photos: David McNew and George Rose

Climate scientists are increasingly able to use computer models to determine how climate change makes some extreme weather more likely.

Why it matters: Climate change's effects are arguably felt most directly through extreme events. Being able to directly attribute the role climate plays in natural catastrophes can help us better prepare for disasters to come, while driving home the need to tackle greenhouse gas emissions.

Amy Harder, author of Generate
46 mins ago - Energy & Environment
Column / Harder Line

Big Tech takes the climate change lead

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Getty Images photo: Jit Chattopadhyay/Pacific Press/LightRocket

The tech industry is playing a growing role in fighting climate change, from zero-carbon commitments to investments in startups and pushing for the use of data to encourage energy efficiency.

Why it matters: Big Tech is already dominating our economy, politics and culture. Its leadership in helping to address climate change — and reckon with its role in contributing to it — could have similarly transformative impacts.