Apr 18, 2019

Justice Department releases redacted version of Mueller report

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The Justice Department released on Thursday a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on his investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, including any potential links to President Trump's campaign.

The big picture: The public release comes just after the redacted report was sent to the House and Senate Judiciary Committees at 11 am ET. Attorney General Bill Barr said earlier this morning that President Trump's personal lawyers were able to view the redacted report earlier this week, which Axios later confirmed.

Read searchable version of report here.

Go deeper: A Mueller report primer

This is a developing story and will be updated.

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Bernie's path to the presidency

Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks yesterday during a rally at Houston University. Photo: Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Lots of Democrats are in full panic that Bernie Sanders will win the nomination and get clobbered in the general election — and bring the party down, too. But the evidence, particularly the polling, doesn't back those doomsday warnings.

Why it matters: Virtually every national and swing state poll shows Sanders tied with or beating President Trump.  And, unlike every rival, he has a huge base of fervent, unshakable supporters he can only grow.

These swing voters don't like Trump’s environmental rollbacks

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Swing voters in four battleground states decisively oppose President Trump’s sweeping rollbacks of environmental regulations — but it’s unlikely to sway their votes.

Why it matters: It’s voters living in states like these, including Florida and Pennsylvania, who fill pivotal roles electing America’s presidents, so we should listen.

Focus group: What some Florida swing voters think of Bloomberg

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Chesnot/Getty Contributor

PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. — Some swing voters here are unbothered by the way Michael Bloomberg is spending heaps of his own money to help him win the race — but they're split over whether they'd actually vote for the New York billionaire over President Trump.

Why it matters: Bloomberg is the only Democrat who was even slightly intriguing to these voters. They're happy with Trump and don't feel like they recognize the current Democratic Party relative to when they voted for Barack Obama.