Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Special counsel Robert Mueller's team has reportedly begun writing its formal report on the investigation into ties between the Trump presidential campaign and Russia, according to CNN.

The big picture: What a wild ride it's been. Since day one, President Trump has criticized the investigation, calling it a witch hunt and rejecting the idea that there was ever any collusion or foul play in his campaign. But that hasn't slowed Mueller down.

We compiled the 10 most significant moments of Mueller's investigation:

  1. The first indictments of Mueller's investigation were brought against former campaign manager Paul Manafort and Manafort's business partner Rick Gates.
  2. Campaign adviser George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. The charges are explicitly linked to attempts of collusion with the Kremlin.
  3. Former national security adviser Michael Flynn pleaded guilty to making "false, fictitious and fraudulent statements and representations" to FBI officials. He agreed to cooperate with Mueller's team.
  4. 13 Russians were indicted on election meddling charges.
  5. Dutch lawyer Alex van der Zwaan was indicted by Mueller on charges linked to lying to the FBI.
  6. Rick Gates pleaded guilty to conspiracy and lying to investigators, signaling that Mueller has gained cooperation from a key figure that worked closely with Trump's campaign.
  7. Manafort pleaded not guilty. He later filed motions to dismiss indictments in D.C. and Virginia. The charges from Mueller included tax fraud, money laundering and failing to register as a foreign agent.
  8. Alex van der Zwaan was sentenced to 30 days in prison — the first sentencing from Mueller's investigation — and received a $20,000 fine. He turned himself in after his sentencing on May 8.
  9. Michael Cohen's office and hotel room were raided by the FBI. This was done "in part" by a referral by Mueller's team, though not explicitly related to the investigation.
  10. Four dozen questions that Mueller wants to ask Trump were revealed by the New York Times. The questions suggest that Mueller's investigation has expanded beyond Russian interference and is also looking Trump's behavior while in office.

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.