Christian Torres / AP

More than 600 businesses are bidding to build President Trump's border wall — including one from Mexico — reports CNBC. Most of the companies submitting their design concepts are based in California and Texas. Maine and Vermont are the only two states that didn't have any businesses apply.

Customs and Border Patrol has also extended the deadline for these initial applications several times, noting that "industry interest has been high."

Note: CBP is expected to release two formal requests for a proposal soon: one which will focus on a concrete wall and another for other types of barriers. The Federal Budget, released this morning, calls for $1.5 billion to be allocated to the wall in FY17, and $2.6 billion in FY18.

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Updated 10 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 33,156,812 — Total deaths: 998,696 — Total recoveries: 22,961,436Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 7,118,523 — Total deaths: 204,790 — Total recoveries: 2,766,280 — Total tests: 101,298,794Map.
  3. Business: Companies are still holding back earnings guidance.
  4. Health: The childless vaccine — Why kids get less severe coronavirus infections.
  5. World: India the second country after U.S. to hit 6 million cases

Facebook's latest headache: Its own employees' posts

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facebook’s rules for what people can say on the world’s largest social network have been a long-term headache for the company, but now it faces similar troubles on the internal network its own staff uses.

Driving the news: As political arguments on Facebook’s employee discussion boards have grown more heated and divisive, the company ordered new restrictions on the forums earlier this month, which run on Facebook’s Workplace platform.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
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How a conservative Supreme Court would impact climate policy

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Amy Coney Barrett's likely ascension to the Supreme Court would affect climate policy beyond shoving the court rightward in the abstract.

Why it matters: If Joe Biden wins the presidential election, his regulations and potential new climate laws would face litigation that could reach the high court.