Dec 23, 2017

More than 24 women come forward with stories of sexual harassment at Vice

Photo: Gary Gershoff / Getty

Vice Media has made four settlements involving sexual harassment and defamation by its male employees — including one against the company's president, according to a New York Times' investigation. More than 24 former and current female employees claimed to have experienced or witnessed sexual harassment involving unwanted kissing, groping and retaliation for refusing sexual advances at the media company.

Why it matters: While most of the accusations of sexual misconduct have been brought upon older, white men, these allegations bring to light a continual degradation of women by a younger generation of 20- to 40-year-olds.

Vice's reaction: Vice co-founder and CEO Shane Smith as well as co-founder Suroosh Alvi said in a statement to the Times, "from the top down, we have failed as a company to create a safe and inclusive workplace where everyone, especially women, can feel respected and thrive." They added that the company's "boys club" culture "fostered inappropriate behavior that permeated throughout the company."

The allegations, according to the Times:

  1. “One woman said she was riding a Ferris wheel at Coney Island after a company event when a co-worker suddenly took her hand and put it on his crotch."
  2. “Another said she felt pressured into a sexual relationship with an executive and was fired after she rejected him."
  3. “A third said that a co-worker grabbed her face and tried to kiss her, and she used her umbrella to fend him off."

Go deeper with The New York Time's investigative reporting.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 1,275,856 — Total deaths: 69,514 — Total recoveries: 262,999Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 337,638 — Total deaths: 9,647 — Total recoveries: 17,582Map.
  3. Federal government latest: Surgeon general says this week will be "our Pearl Harbor, our 9/11 moment." The USDA confirms that a Bronx zoo tiger tested positive for coronavirus.
  4. 2020 latest: "We have no contingency plan," Trump said on the 2020 Republican National Convention. Biden says DNC may have to hold virtual convention.
  5. States updates: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the state is "literally going day-to-day" with supplies.
  6. World update: Queen Elizabeth II urges the British people to confront pandemic with "self-discipline" and "resolve" in rare televised address.
  7. What should I do? Pets, moving and personal health. Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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World coronavirus updates: Fewer deaths in Italy and Spain, U.K. toll jumps

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

Health officials in Italy and Spain are seeing a glimmer of hope, as both countries reported a decline in deaths from the novel coronavirus Sunday. But the death toll continues to surge in the United Kingdom, which now has the world's fourth highest number of fatalities from COVID-19.

The big picture: The virus has killed more than 69,000 people and infected 1.25 million others globally as of early Monday, per Johns Hopkins data. Spain has reported the most cases outside the U.S. (more than 131,000) and Italy the most deaths (over 15,000). About half the planet's population is now on lockdown.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health

U.S. coronavirus updates: Death toll passes 9,600

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Recorded deaths from the novel coronavirus surpassed 9,600 in the U.S. Sunday night, per Johns Hopkins data. The death toll in the U.S. has risen over 1,000 every day since April 1.

Why it matters: U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams said on Sunday this upcoming week will be "the hardest and saddest week of most Americans' lives" — calling it our "our Pearl Harbor, our 9/11 moment."

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health