Dr. J. Mario Molina / Molina Healthcare

Health insurer Molina Healthcare has abruptly fired its candid CEO, Dr. J. Mario Molina, and his brother and chief financial officer, John Molina, because of the company's "disappointing financial performance," Molina Chairman Dale Wolf said Tuesday. Their dad, an emergency room doctor, started the Medicaid-based insurance company in 1980 as a network of clinics for the poor.

Why this matters: This comes out of nowhere. Molina, a major player on the Affordable Care Act's individual marketplaces, had a rough 2016 due to the ACA plans. But the company was still profitable overall. Molina has been one of the most outspoken health insurance CEOs and was particularly critical of Republican efforts to repeal and replace the ACA.

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Trump refuses to answer question on whether he supports QAnon conspiracy theory

President Trump on Friday refused to answer a direct question on whether or not he supports the QAnon conspiracy theory during a press briefing.

Why it matters: Trump congratulated Georgia Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene, who vocally supports the conspiracy theory, on her victory in a House primary runoff earlier this week — illustrating how the once-fringe conspiracy theory has gained ground within his party.

Postal workers' union endorses Biden

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The National Association of Letter Carriers, the union representing roughly 300,000 current and former postal workers, on Friday endorsed Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election, calling him "a fierce ally and defender of the U.S. Postal Service," reports NBC News.

Why it matters: The endorsement comes as President Trump has vowed to block additional funding for the USPS in the next coronavirus stimulus package, linking it to his continued baseless claims that increased mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud.

Lawmakers demand answers from World Bank on Xinjiang loan

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

U.S. lawmakers are demanding answers from the World Bank about its continued operation of a $50 million loan program in Xinjiang, following Axios reporting on the loans.

Why it matters: The Chinese government is currently waging a campaign of cultural and demographic genocide against ethnic minorities in Xinjiang, in northwest China. The lawmakers contend that the recipients of the loans may be complicit in that repression.