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Data: PwC; Chart: Harry Stevens/Axios

Video games used to be played on big screens through expensive consoles on couches in your mom's basement. Soon, when we think of games, we'll think of our phones instead.

Driving the news: This year's E3 conference, video gaming's largest global event, shows mobile gaming on platforms scaling up and opening new media frontiers.

  • Microsoft announced upcoming tests this fall for its Project xCloud streaming service — a platform allowing users to stream high-end games on mobile devices.
  • Bethesda games is relaunching '90s hit Commander Keen as a mobile game and unveiled its new streaming service, Orion, on a mobile phone.

By the numbers: Revenues from social gaming are expected to outpace traditional console gaming in the next few years in revenue and popularity.

  • Mobile and social gaming are expected to grow nearly 7% by 2023 to $13.8 billion, per PwC.
  • Traditional, console-based gaming is expected to jump about 3% in that same span to about $15 billion.
  • 39% of the gaming population polled in a Deloitte study say they use a mobile device at least half the time.

The big picture: The future of gaming is one where casual gamers just whip out their phones and play on the go.

  • Consoles are powerful but costly and restricting, and Big Tech is building new platforms like Google's Stadia and Apple Arcade to work around them. Meanwhile, 5G will enable lower-latency streaming, which is crucial for games.
  • "Gamers, right now, don't expect the same experience when they leave the house. 5G allows you to have that — and we're only 12 to 18 months away from it," Andrew Paradise, founder of Skillz Inc., told Axios.

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20 Republican former U.S. attorneys endorse Biden, call Trump "a threat to the rule of law"

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Twenty Republican former U.S. Attorneys on Tuesday endorsed Joe Biden while saying that "President Trump's leadership is a threat to rule of law" in the U.S., the Washington Post reports.

What they're saying: In the letter, the former prosecutors criticize Trump's use of the Department of Justice, saying the president expects the DOJ to "to serve his personal and political interests."

  • "He has politicized the Justice Department, dictating its priorities along political lines and breaking down the barrier that prior administrations had maintained between political and prosecutorial decision-making," the letter says.
Updated 32 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Axios-Ipsos poll: Federal response has only gotten worse — The swing states where the pandemic is raging.
  2. Health: The coronavirus is starting to crush some hospitals — 13 states set single-day case records last week.
  3. Business: Winter coronavirus threat spurs new surge of startup activity.
  4. Media: Pandemic causes cable and satellite TV providers to lose the most subscribers ever.
  5. States: Nearly two dozen Minnesota COVID cases traced to 3 Trump campaign events.
  6. World: Unrest in Italy as restrictions grow across Europe.

Ted Cruz defends GOP's expected return to prioritizing national debt

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) told "Axios on HBO" on Monday that he wishes reining in the national debt was a higher priority for President Trump.

Why it matters: Trump pledged during the 2016 campaign to reduce the national debt and eliminate it entirely within eight years, though he also deemed himself "the king of debt" and said there were some priorities that required spending. In the fiscal year that ended in September, the deficit reached a record $3.1 trillion.