Google is one of several big tech comapnies facing new political pressure. Photo: Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP

Missouri's attorney general is investigating Google for potential violations of the state's competition and consumer protection laws.

Why it matters: The United States has lagged behind Europe in pursuing antitrust cases against tech giants. It's not clear that that's going to change anytime soon in Washington, but state AGs could channel a rising skepticism of Big Tech's influence into their own investigations.

The details: The probe focuses on Google's handling of consumer data, "alleged manipulation of search results to preference websites owned by Google and to demote websites that compete with Google," and allegations that the company "unlawfully scrapes content" from its competitors. It was first reported by the Kansas City Star. Google declined to comment.

Worth noting: The attorney general, Josh Hawley, is running for Senate next year, and struck a populist tone in announcing his investigation. "There is strong reason to believe that Google has not been acting with the best interest of Missourians in mind," he said in a statement.

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Joe Biden speaks Friday about "The Biden Plan to Beat COVID-19," at The Queen theater in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

This is one of the bigger signs of trouble for President Trump that we've seen in a poll: Of the final debate's seven topics, Joe Biden won or tied on all seven when viewers in a massive Axios-SurveyMonkey sample were asked who they trusted more to handle the issue.

Why it matters: In a time of unprecedented colliding crises for the nation, the polling considered Biden to be vastly more competent.

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Why it matters: You may know this insect species by its nom de guerre: "the murder hornet." While the threat they pose to humans has been overstated, the invading hornets could decimate local honeybee populations if they establish themselves.