Updated Feb 17, 2020 - Energy & Environment

What we know: Mississippi braces for intense flooding as Pearl River swells

Floodwaters are slowly on the rise in areas around the Pearl River. Photo: City of Jackson/Twitter

Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves (R) has declared a state of emergency as authorities brace for "historic" floods, with days of rain expected, as the Pearl River continues to swell in and around the state capital, Jackson.

What's happening: Evacuations have already begun, and the river isn't expected to crest until Monday. Reeves described the situation as precarious. "We expect water to stay in the area for 2-3 days, with rain throughout the week," he tweeted.

  • Projections indicate Mississippi could experience the "third-worst flood in our state’s history," Reeves said in a Twitter post announcing the emergency declaration on Saturday.

Evacuations: The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries went door-to-door to alert 510 people "in an effort to evacuate the areas," MEMA said Sunday.

  • The Office of Homeland Security assisted in four evacuations in two counties, it added.

The impact: Four injuries have already been reported and 18 counties had submitted damage reports to the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency by Sunday.

Go deeper: Study: Climate change effects apparent in daily global weather data

Editor's note: This story will be updated as it develops.

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Heavy rain expected to pummel already-flooded Mississippi

This drone photo shows flooding on Feb. 15. Photo: Melvin Martin/Hardin County Fire Department, Savannah, Tennessee, via AP

More rain is expected to barrage Mississippi's already-flooded capital city of Jackson later on Tuesday, according to the National Weather Service.

The state of play: Heavy rain is projected to strike eastern Louisiana, central parts of Mississippi, Alabama and even into far western Georgia, the Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland, predicts, per AP. As much as 2 inches is expected to fall rapidly in Mississippi, prompting flash flood warnings.

Go deeperArrowFeb 18, 2020 - Science

1.5 billion tons of water evaporates from the Colorado River

The waters of Lake Powell. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

New research blames climate change for more than 1 billion tons of water that has evaporated from the Colorado River, the Washington Post reports.

What's happening: The findings published in Science on Thursday by the U.S. Geological Survey, show the annual flow of the West's vital river is declining due to warmer temperatures, comparable to the annual water consumption of 10 million Americans.

Washington schools shut as Gov. Inslee seeks $100M to fight coronavirus

A health care worker prepares to transport a patient on a stretcher into an ambulance at Life Care Center of Kirkland, Feb. 29, Kirkland, Washington. Photo: David Ryder/Getty Images

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D) told a news conference Monday he directed officials to ask the state legislature to designate $100 million from this year's budget to help fight the novel coronavirus.

Why it matters: The state is at the center of the U.S. outbreak. All six of the deaths from COVID-19 in the U.S. have occurred in Washington state. Four of those who died were residents of the Life Care Center in the Seattle suburb of Kirkland in King County. Several of the 18 coronavirus infections in the state are residents of the nursing home.

Go deeperArrowMar 3, 2020 - Health