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Photo: Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty Images

Sens. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and Mitt Romney (R-Utah) on Tuesday unveiled the details of their proposal to raise the minimum wage to $10 an hour by 2025.

Why it matters: The Republican proposal comes as Congressional Democrats are pushing for a bill, backed by President Joe Biden and included in the broader $1.9 trillion stimulus package, that would increase the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2025.

Details: In addition to gradually increasing the federal minimum wage and youth minimum wage each year after the "COVID-19 emergency," Romney and Cotton's proposal would mandate E-Verify for all employers to ensure the rising wages go to "legally authorized workers."

Driving the news: The Senate parliamentarian will decide as early Tuesday whether the Democrats’ minimum wage measure can be included in the relief package and voted on through a budget reconciliation process, which means it will only need a simple majority to pass.

  • If it’s not included in the larger bill, it's very likely any increase in the minimum wage will need to have bipartisan support.

Be smart: Democrats have long pushed for an incremental minimum wage hike to $15 an hour, but the president has said that he doesn’t expect the provision to survive negotiations — especially after two moderate Democrats came out against including the measure in the massive relief package.

  • Biden has promised to promote a standalone bill to raise the minimum wage.
  • The $10 an hour proposal by Republicans could act as a first step to compromise in passing a separate bill, but it's unlikely that Democrats will accept the provisions related to undocumented immigrants.

By the numbers: The federal minimum wage has been $7.25 per hour since 2009, which amounts to about $15,000 per year at 40-hour weeks.

  • The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office released a study earlier this month that found that the $15 federal minimum wage bill would cut jobs for 1.4 million workers by 2025. Subsequently, it would lift 900,000 people out of poverty.

Go deeper

Feb 22, 2021 - Politics & Policy

Bipartisanship ends this week with stimulus vote

Rep. Jason Smith (from left), House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Minority Whip Steve Scalise. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Bipartisanship - at least over President Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus plan — appears over, with House Democrats ready to approve the measure this week through a party-line vote.

Between the lines: The GOP, which is already whipping against the bill, plans to cast it as a progressive wishlist and argue Democrats are bulldozing Republicans despite Biden's pledge to work with them.

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Americans increasingly see China as an enemy

One in three Americans, and a majority of Republicans, now view China as an enemy of the United States, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center.

By the numbers: Just 9% of Americans consider China a "partner," while 55% see Beijing as a "competitor" and 34% as an "enemy."

Scoop: Leaked HHS docs spotlight Biden's child migrant dilemma

A group of undocumented immigrants walk toward a Customs and Border Patrol station after being apprehended. Photo: Sergio Flores/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Fresh internal documents from the Department of Health and Human Services show how quickly the number of child migrants crossing the border is overwhelming the administration's stretched resources.

Driving the news: In the week ending March 1, the Border Patrol referred to HHS custody an average of 321 children per day, according to documents obtained by Axios. That's up from a weekly average of 203 in late January and early February — and just 47 per day during the first week of January.