One in five millennials live in poverty. Photo: Richard Levine / Corbis via Getty Images

In a data-driven deep dive, the Huffington Post reports on the rising student debt numbers and weakening 401(k) returns that are hurting Millennials — America's largest generation.

The bottom line: "Millennials are facing the scariest financial future of any generation since the Great Depression," per the Huffington Post's Michael Hobbes.

The numbers for millennials:

  • 300% more student debt than their parents, on average.
  • 1/2 as likely to own a home as young people — ages 25–34 — were in 1975.
  • One in five of young adults live in poverty.2.9% average annual returns on 401(k) plans, compared to 6.3% returns for baby boomers.
  • Many millennials will have to work until the age of 75, based on an analysis of federal data.
  • A typical 2009 college graduate could earn up to $58,600 less than a typical 2007 college graduate over a decade, based on current trends.
  • The American racial wealth gap is widening, with the median white household projected to have 86 times more wealth than the median black household by 2020.

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
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  5. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19 — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.

The positions of key GOP senators on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee by next week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just over six weeks out from Election Day.

The big picture: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." But Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) told Alaska Public Media, "I would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. We are 50 some days away from an election."

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

ActBlue collects a record $91 million in hours after Ginsburg's death

A makeshift memorial in honor of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Sept. 19. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

ActBlue received a record $91.4 million in the 28 hours following Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, the Democratic donation-processing site confirmed to Axios late Saturday.

Why it matters via the New York Times: "The unprecedented outpouring shows the power of a looming Supreme Court confirmation fight to motivate Democratic donors."