Nov 19, 2019

A new view of the Milky Way

Photo: NASA/MIT/TESS

The Milky Way shines in a photo taken by a space telescope designed to hunt for planets circling stars far from our own solar system.

Details: The image by NASA's TESS was released on Nov. 5 and was created by piecing together 208 photos taken by the telescope during its first year gathering science from orbit.

  • "Within this scene, TESS has discovered 29 exoplanets, or worlds beyond our solar system, and more than 1,000 candidate planets astronomers are now investigating," NASA said in a statement.

How it works: TESS looks for planets by keeping an eye out for minute dips in a star's light created when a world passes in front of its star.

  • By clocking these transits, scientists can gather data about a planet’s size to bring us closer to finding another world like Earth somewhere out in the galaxy.

Go deeper: The Milky Way in 3D

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What's next for the Parker Solar Probe

Illustration of the Parker Solar Probe in front of the Sun. Photo: NASA/Johns Hopkins APL

A new series of studies based on data beamed back from the Sun-studying Parker Solar Probe could help scientists better predict dangerous space weather.

Why it matters: Streams of charged particles sent out by the Sun create space weather that can affect satellites, electrical grids on Earth and even people in orbit.

Go deeperArrowDec 10, 2019

NASA's difficult road to the Moon

Photo: NASA

A new report paints a stark picture of NASA's progress toward accomplishing its Artemis mission to the Moon in 2024.

Why it matters: The report from NASA's inspector general — and others like it — reveals some of what lurks below the positive face the space agency puts forward announcing its accomplishments and hyping its future endeavors.

Go deeperArrowNov 19, 2019

Newfound interstellar comet shines as it moves closer to the Sun

Photo: Pieter van Dokkum/Cheng-Han Hsieh/Shany Danieli/Gregory Laughlin

An interstellar comet spotted earlier this year is on its way to its close approach to the Sun this month, giving astronomers a close-up view of the visitor from outside our solar system.

What's happening: A new photo taken by Yale astronomers shows Comet 2l/Borisov's 100,000-mile-long tail and 1-mile-across nucleus in new detail.

Go deeperArrowDec 4, 2019