Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Searching for smart, safe news you can TRUST?

Support safe, smart, REAL journalism. Sign up for our Axios AM & PM newsletters and get smarter, faster.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Members of the military are cheered as they parade through Bamako following the mutiny. Photo: AFP via Getty

Mali's President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta announced his resignation on Tuesday, hours after soldiers arrested him, along with the prime minister and other top officials, per state television.

Why it matters: The uprising from within the military follows months of protests in the West African country. It's unclear who will take charge if Keïta is removed from power, adding deep uncertainty to Mali's intertwined political and security crises.

The big picture: Protests have rumbled on since June in the capital, Bamako, over corruption and a deteriorating security situation.

  • Judd Devermont, director of the Africa program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, says, "Insecurity is the backdrop to this, but it's really about political disillusionment and a sense that this is a government that is focused on enrichment and self-interest and not democracy — not addressing the needs of the public during a pandemic and an economic recession."
  • Keïta, two years into his second five-year presidential term, had resisted calls to resign but failed to appease the protesters.

Driving the news: Prime Minister Boubou Cissé called for dialogue after the mutiny began, before apparently being detained. State TV temporarily went off the air, and European embassies said they'd been warned that soldiers were heading toward Bamako.

  • Protesters gathered to celebrate the news, particularly after rumors of Keïta's arrest began to circulate, Reuters reports. Soldiers were greeted with cheers as they drove through the capital.
  • "It was not immediately clear who was leading the mutineers, who would govern in Keita’s absence or what the mutineers’ motivations were. A military spokesman said he had no information," Reuters notes.

What they're saying: ECOWAS, a bloc of regional countries, urged the mutineers to "return to their positions without delay," while the African Union said it "strongly rejects any attempt at the unconstitutional change of government in Mali."

  • France, which has ongoing counter-insurgency operations in Mali, also condemned the uprising. President Emmanuel Macron has discussed it with regional leaders, per AFP.
  • The U.S. has also said it opposes "all extraconstitutional change" in Mali.

What to watch: "It's incumbent on the region and its partners to stabilize the political situation as soon as possible because if this continues to spin out, it will create more opportunities for deterioration in the rest of the country," Devermont says.

  • The military handed over power to civilian leaders after the 2012 coup, but the instability also allowed extremist groups in north and central Mali to strengthen their positions.

Editor's note: This article has been updated with news of Keïta's resignation.

Go deeper

15 mins ago - Podcasts

How hospitals are prepping for the new COVID-19 surge

Coronavirus cases and hospitalizations are surging, particularly in areas that had been largely spared this spring. One big question now is whether hospitals are better prepared for this new wave, including if they'll be able to continue providing elective services.

Axios Re:Cap digs into what hospitals have, and what they still need, with Lloyd Dean, CEO of CommonSpirit Health, one of America's largest operators of hospitals and health clinics.

Updated 23 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — U.S. sets new single-day case record.
  2. Politics: States beg for Warp Speed billions.
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local cases.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.
43 mins ago - World

Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of COVID-19 cases

Belgium Prime Minister Alexander De Croo. Photo: THIERRY ROGE/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images

Belgium is enforcing a strict lockdown starting Sunday amid rising coronavirus infections, hospital admissions and a surge of deaths, Prime Minister Alexander De Croo announced on Friday.

Why it matters: De Croo said the government saw no choice but to lock down "to ensure that our health care system does not collapse." Scientists and health officials said deaths have doubled every six days, per the Guardian.