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Adapted from Redfin; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new study from Redfin, the online real estate brokerage, helps connect the dots on whether migrations patterns from blue cities (like Milwaukee, Boston and Portland) to Sun Belt cities (like Tampa, Phoenix and Miami) during the pandemic could have political implications — though the line is a bit blurry.

The big picture: Daryl Fairweather, Redfin's chief economist, told me there was no way to tell if the people moving from blue to red places were attracted by the more right-leaning politics or whether they were Democrats who could potentially shift the center of gravity.

  • "In our migration patterns, people are moving from the blue counties to the more red-leaning counties, and that could have implications for — or change — the election," Fairweather said.
  • Lower taxes and less density are also motivators.

The bottom line: "The most popular places people are moving to are the swing counties, which I think is interesting given how polarized the country is," Fairweather said.

  • It seemed to her "that people do want to live in areas where there's a mix of Republicans and Democrats."

Go deeper

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Oct 15, 2020 - Economy & Business

A property tax proposal to unfreeze commercial real estate

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

One undisputed victim of the pandemic is the commercial real-estate market — both offices and retail — as people work from home and go out less.

Why it matters: The problem is that commercial real estate prices are sticky. They go up a lot more easily than they come down. If they would come down to a market-clearing level, that would vastly increase economic activity and help cities — New York foremost among them — get back on their feet.

Biden picks Warren allies to lead SEC, CFPB

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden has selected FTC commissioner Rohit Chopra to be the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Obama-era Wall Street regulator Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Why it matters: Both picks are progressive allies of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and viewed as likely to take aggressive steps to regulate big business.

The perils of organizing underground

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Researchers see one bright spot as far-right extremists turn to private and encrypted online platforms: Friction.

Between the lines: For fringe organizers, those platforms may provide more security than open social networks, but they make it harder to recruit new members.