Jan 6, 2019

Mulvaney: Trump would build "steel fence" as concession to Democrats

Acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney told Chuck Todd on NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday that President Trump would be willing to "give up a concrete wall, replace it with a steel fence" at the U.S.-Mexico border in order to appease Democrats and end the government shutdown.

Background: While Trump floated his own "totally effective" and "beautiful" steel version of a border wall last month, Mulvaney's semantics on the issue highlight the still-vast distance between the White House and congressional Democrats. After a 16-day shutdown, little headway has been made in negotiations, and Vice President Mike Pence said yesterday that the White House won't accept anything less than the $5.7 billion in wall funding it originally requested.

Go deeper: Federal workers could be the force that ends the shutdown

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Updated 16 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 6,309,107 — Total deaths: 376,885 — Total recoveries — 2,725,627Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 1,812,742 — Total deaths: 105,475 — Total recoveries: 458,231 — Total tested: 17,340,682Map.
  3. Public health: Protests against police brutality threaten coronavirus response — Controlling the coronavirus in nursing homes won't be easy.
  4. Business: More than 1 in 6 black workers lost jobs between February and April.
  5. Climate: The alarm over climate financial risk gets louder because of coronavirus.
  6. Media: Interest in the George Floyd protests has soared past the coronavirus.

Julián Castro endorses Joe Biden for president

Julián Castro introduces Sen. Elizabeth Warren at an event in February. Photo: Ronda Churchill/AFP via Getty Images

Julián Castro, who ended his presidential campaign in early January, endorsed Joe Biden today with a call for "real reform to address our broken policing system."

Why it matters: Castro’s endorsement comes as protests against police use of excessive force, especially in communities of color, have wracked the country for the past week, triggered by the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody. Throughout the primary, Castro made police reform a central part of his campaign.

40 mins ago - Technology

Podcast: Social media maelstrom

Hundreds of Facebook employees yesterday walked off the job to protest the big blue app's refusal to pull certain posts from President Trump, days after Trump threatened to change the laws around social media in response to a Twitter fact-check. Dan digs into what comes next with attorney Stewart Baker, former Department of Homeland Security assistant secretary for policy.