Nov 9, 2018

Michelle Obama will “never forgive” Trump for stirring up birther conspiracies

Michelle Obama and president-elect Donald Trump at his inauguration. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Former First Lady Michelle Obama writes in her new book, "Becoming," that she will "never forgive" President Trump for encouraging the birther conspiracy about her husband in 2011, ABC News reports.

Details: Per ABC, Obama writes that playing into the conspiracy is "crazy and mean-spirited... But it was also dangerous, deliberately meant to stir up the wingnuts and kooks. What if someone with an unstable mind loaded a gun and drove to Washington? ... Donald Trump, with his loud and reckless innuendos, was putting my family's safety at risk. And for this, I'd never forgive him."

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