Michael Jordan at a memorial for Kobe & Gianna Bryant on February 24 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Michael Jordan and the Jordan Brand announced on Friday plans for a $100 million donation over the next decade "to organizations dedicated to ensuring racial equality, social justice and greater access to education."

Driving the news: Following George Floyd's killing and 11 days worth of Black Lives Matter protests in cities across the country, a variety of current and former athletes have also called for social justice reform.

The big picture: Black Americans are dying from the coronavirus at disproportionately high rates in many cities and states — which health officials attribute to the effects of economic inequality and chronic health conditions — while facing a greater likelihood of being shot and killed by police.

What they're saying: "The Jordan Brand is us, the Black Community," Jordan said in a statement. "We represent a proud family that has overcome obstacles, fought against discrimination in communities worldwide and that works every day to erase the stain of racism and the damage of injustice."

  • "Black lives matter. This isn't a controversial statement. Until the ingrained racism that allows our country's institutions to fail is completely eradicated, we will remain committed to protecting and improving the lives of Black people," the company said.

Jordan also released a statement last Sunday addressing the death of Floyd, saying:

"I don't have the answers, but our collective voices show strength and the inability to be divided by others. We must listen to each other, show compassion and empathy and never turn our backs on senseless brutality. We need to continue peaceful expressions against injustice and demand accountability. Our unified voice needs to put pressure on our leaders to change our laws, or else we need to use our vote to create systemic change. Every one of us needs to be part of the solution, and we must work together to ensure justice for all."

The statement did not specify which organizations the donations will support.

Go deeper: Black Americans' competing crises

Go deeper

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