Reps. Jerry Nadler and Hakeem Jeffries on Capitol Hill on Feb. 5. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) said he plans to schedule a hearing with Attorney General Bill Barr "as soon as possible" in light of the Justice Department's move on Thursday to drop its prosecution of former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Driving the news: The DOJ's motion to dismiss charges against Flynn, who pleaded guilty in the Mueller investigation in 2017 to lying to FBI agents, was signed by U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia Timothy Shea, described by Fox News as Barr's "right-hand man."

What they're saying: “The decision to drop the charges against General Flynn is outrageous. The evidence against General Flynn is overwhelming. He pleaded guilty to lying to investigators. And now a politicized and thoroughly corrupt Department of Justice is going to let the President’s crony simply walk away. Americans are right to be furious and worried about the continued erosion of our rule of law," Nadler said in a statement on Thursday.

  • “Even in the height of a national emergency—perhaps especially so—our country requires an impartial justice system. We are not supposed to get special treatment because we are friends with the President or refused to cooperate with federal investigators on his behalf. The decision to overrule the special counsel is without precedent and requires immediate explanation," Nadler said.
  • "Today’s move by the Justice Department has nothing to do with the facts or the law — it is pure politics designed to please the president," former acting FBI director Andrew McCabe said in a statement Thursday.
  • "Flynn pled guilty to lying to the FBI about his illicit Russian contacts. His lies do not now become truths. This dismissal does not exonerate him. But it does incriminate Bill Barr. In the worst politicization of the Justice Department in its history," House Intelligence Chair Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) tweeted on Thursday.
  • "The DOJ has lost its way. But, career people: please stay because America needs you. The country is hungry for honest, competent leadership," former FBI director James Comey tweeted on Thursday.
  • “Attorney General Barr’s politicization of justice knows no bounds. Michael Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to federal investigators in the face of overwhelming evidence – but now, Attorney General Barr’s Justice Department is dropping the case to continue to cover up for the President," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a statement Thursday.

Go deeper: Top Michael Flynn prosecutor moves to withdraw from case

Go deeper

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Attorney General Bill Barr. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

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Why it matters: The Trump administration's deployment expands its "Operation Legend" program as President Trump has blamed spikes of violence across the U.S. on activists' efforts to "dismantle and dissolve" local law enforcement. Democrats have accused Trump of targeting Democratic-run cities as part of his "law and order" messaging strategy following the police killing of George Floyd.

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