Oct 23, 2019

Schools giving students mental-health days

Students at El Sereno Middle School in Los Angeles in 2019. Photo: Scott Varley/MediaNews Group/Daily Breeze via Getty Images

Some states and school systems are letting students stay home for mental health reasons in light of rising youth anxiety, depression and suicide rates, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: The suicide rate for people ages 10 to 24 increased by 56% between 2007 and 2017, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released this month.

Details: Utah and Oregon have enacted laws allowing mental health days, and students in Colorado, Florida and Washington are pushing similar bills.

The other side: The laws didn't pass without controversy. Some lawmakers argued that students need to toughen up or that the new rules could affect athletics or absenteeism.

  • "The bottom line of this is there will be students that will abuse the system but there will be students that this will save," Oregon high school senior Derek Evans responded.

Go deeper: Why we're failing to stop teen suicide

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CDC: The jobs with the highest rates of suicide in the U.S.

Data: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2018 analyzed suicide deaths among working-age Americans in 17 states to understand how different types of work influence a person's risk of killing oneself.

Why it matters: The CDC found that the suicide rate for people ages 16–64 years old rose 34% between 2000 and 2016, from 12.9 to 17.3 suicides per 100,000 workers. The federal agency also reported that suicide rates varied widely across occupational groups and that people involved in certain types of work, such as construction and extraction or production jobs, may be at a higher risk of suicide than other workers.

Go deeperArrowNov 17, 2019

Providers, employers link up on suicide prevention

Aïda Amer/Axios

Hospital-based programs are working with employers and community organizations to tackle gun violence and suicide.

What's happening: Companies have pleaded with Congress to pass stronger gun control laws to help stop workplace shootings and suicides. But as bills from the House stall in the Senate, employers are turning to health care providers for help.

Go deeperArrowOct 28, 2019

International college student enrollment falls for third consecutive year

George Washington University students. Photo: Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A new Institute of International Education report shows that the number of international students newly enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities fell by 1% last academic year, per AP.

Why it matters: The drop marks the third consecutive year that enrollment for international students dipped, following 7% and 3% decreases in the two previous years, which were the first downturns in more than a decade.

Go deeperArrowNov 18, 2019