Richard Drew / AP

Meg Whitman officially took herself out of the running to be the next CEO at Uber, saying in a series of tweets that she is committed to her current job as CEO of Hewlett-Packard Enterprise.

  • "We have a lot of work still to do at HPE and I am not going anywhere," Whitman said Thursday night. "Uber's CEO will not be Meg Whitman."
  • Who is in the running?: GE CEO Jeff Immelt is said to be on Uber's shortlist.
  • The backstory: Whitman stepped down earlier this week from the board of the PC spin-off HP Inc., adding fuel to speculation she was considering the Uber job. Axios' Dan Primack reported earlier that although Whitman was the frontrunner, Uber's board wasn't yet sold on Whitman.

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Updated 6 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 7,116,455 — Total deaths: 204,762 — Total recoveries: 2,766,280 — Total tests: 101,298,794Map.
  3. States: 3 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week
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16 mins ago - Technology

Exclusive: Where Trump and Biden stand on tech issues

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Getty Images photos: Win McNamee and Saul Loeb/AFP

Joe Biden has laid out a more concrete tech agenda whereas President Trump has focused on tax cuts and deregulation while criticizing tech firms for anti-conservative bias. That's according to a side-by-side analysis of the two candidates' tech records by the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation shared exclusively with Axios.

Why it matters: The tech industry needs to prepare for either four more years of Trump's impulsive policy approach or for a Biden administration that's likely to be critical of tech but slow to take action.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Big Tech's share of the S&P 500 reached record level in August

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Reproduced from The Leuthold Group; Chart: Axios Visuals

The gap between the weighting of the five largest companies in the S&P 500 and the 300 smallest rose to the highest ever at the end of August, according to data from the Leuthold Group.

Why it matters: The concentration of wealth in a few massive U.S. tech companies has reached a scale significantly greater than it was before the dot-com bubble burst.