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J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Special Counsel Robert Mueller is leading the Russia investigation and, most recently, the investigation into whether President Trump obstructed justice. Suffice to say, he's taking the matter seriously, as evidenced by the team of lawyers he has quietly hired over the past few weeks to help him.

Between the lines: The people he's hired don't just look tough on paper — they're legal experts with unique, complementary strengths who have fought and investigated crime all around the world. Their expertise suggests how Mueller views this investigation and the direction in which he is hoping to take it.

The original team started as just three lawyers (plus Mueller) who all once worked at the law firm WilmerHale, where Mueller has worked since his 2013 departure from the FBI. Meet the full investigation dream team:

Aaron Zebley, Mueller's chief of staff when he was FBI director
  • Zebley was an elite FBI agent for 7 years in the Counterterrorism Division
  • He was instrumental in tracking down dangerous Al Qaeda members back in 1999
  • He then became a prosecutor and one of Mueller's go-to confidants
  • He was part of the I-49 team: a small group of FBI agents based in NYC who were actively searching for Osama Bin Laden before the 9/11 attacks
James Quarles III, former Watergate investigator
  • A litigator and a partner at WilmerHale, where he started in 1975. He runs the DC office of the firm
  • He served as an assistant special prosecutor for the Watergate investigation
  • During that investigation, Quarles focused on campaign finance research — something that will certainly be called upon throughout the Russia investigation, particularly after the FBI issued subpoenas for financial disclosures from Michael Flynn and Paul Manafort
  • He has argued cases in front of the Supreme Court
Jeannie Rhee, former deputy attorney general in the Office of Legal Counsel
  • Rhee was senior adviser to former Attornery General Eric Holder for two years
  • She advised him and the WH on "constitutional, statutory and regulatory issues regarding criminal law, criminal procedure, executive privilege, civil rights and national security," according to WilmerHale.
  • She tried more than 30 cases when she served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the D.C. Attorney's Office
  • She rejoined WilmerHale as a partner in the Litigation/Controversy Department where she advised "clients who are the subject of government investigations" regarding "white-collar criminal investigations, False Claims Act allegations and securities enforcement matters."
  • In 2015, Rhee represented Hillary Clinton in a case about her private email server, according to Politico.
Andrew Weissmann, DOJ criminal fraud section chief
  • He was Mueller's one-time general counsel
  • Previously led the fraud unit at the DOJ
  • Weismann oversaw the Enron Task Force in the early 2000s, investigating the failed energy company
  • From 1991 to 2002, Weissmann handled cases against various crime families in NY as part of his work in the office of the U.S. Attorney for New York's Eastern District
  • He worked at a law firm where he focused on the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, securities fraud, and other issues.
Michael Dreeben, DOJ's deputy solicitor general
  • Dreeben currently serves in the Justice Department, overseeing its criminal docket before the Supreme Court and handling its appellate cases
  • He has argued more than 100 cases in front of the Supreme Court
  • He was a deputy in the Office of the Solicitor General
  • He's been heralded as "1 of the top legal & appellate minds at DOJ in modern times," and has been called "the most brilliant and most knowledgeable federal criminal lawyer in America—period."
Lisa Page, an experienced DOJ trial attorney
  • There has been no official announcement from the special counsel about Page, but WIRED notes Mueller has reached out to her
  • Her investigatory expertise: organized crime cases, money laundering, and one particularly relevant case where she partnered with Hungary's FBI task force to investigate European organized crime.
  • Note: Her work in Hungary is what led to the ongoing money laundering case against Dmitry Firtash, a Ukrainian leader who was once business partners with Paul Manafort.

Go deeper

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Photo: Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images

Investors made clear what companies they think will be winners and which will be losers in President Joe Biden's economy on Wednesday, selling out of gun makers, pot purveyors, private prison operators and payday lenders, and buying up gambling, gaming, beer stocks and Big Tech.

What happened: Private prison operator CoreCivic and private prison REIT Geo fell by 7.8% and 4.1%, respectively, while marijuana ETF MJ dropped 2% and payday lenders World Acceptance and EZCorp each fell by more than 1%.

Mike Allen, author of AM
1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Biden-Harris, Day 1: What mattered most

President Joe Biden and first lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at the North Portico of the White House. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

The Axios experts help you sort significance from symbolism. Here are the six Day 1 actions by President Biden that matter most.

Driving the news: Today, on his first full day, Biden translates his promise of a stronger federal response to the pandemic into action — starting with 10 executive orders and other directives, Caitlin Owens writes.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Read: Pete Buttigieg's opening statement ahead of confirmation hearing

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to be secretary of transportation, in December. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/AFP via Getty Images

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to lead the Transportation Department, will tell senators he plans to prioritize the health and safety of public transportation systems during the pandemic — and look to infrastructure projects to rebuild the economy — according to a copy of his prepared remarks obtained by Axios.

Driving the news: Buttigieg will testify at 10 a.m. ET before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. He is expected to face a relatively smooth confirmation process, though GOP lawmakers may press him on "green" elements of Biden's transportation proposals.