Mar 19, 2020 - Health

Medicare clarifies which procedures hospitals should postpone

Photo: Agence Photographique BSIP via Getty Images

Hospitals and surgery centers should delay less urgent procedures like carpal tunnel surgeries, cataract surgeries, colonoscopies and joint replacements, but they should not postpone more serious care such as cancer treatments, brain surgeries, transplants, trauma care and major heart surgeries, according to new recommendations from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Why it matters: Health care providers are delaying elective care to keep beds open and to prevent patients from catching the new coronavirus, but that does not mean patients should be cut off from lifesaving treatments if they need them.

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What health care is getting out of the stimulus package

Hospitals stand to gain a lot of money from the stimulus. Photos: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Congress' big stimulus package will provide more than $100 billion and several favorable payment policies to hospitals, doctors and others in the health care system as they grapple with the coronavirus outbreak.

The big picture: Hospitals, including those that treat a lot of rural and low-income patients, are getting the bailout they asked for — and then some.

Go deeperArrowMar 26, 2020 - Health

Small hospitals worry about getting bailout money quickly

A rural hospital in Washington state. Photo: Nick Otto/Washington Post via Getty Images

Congress is about to provide $100 billion for hospitals and other health care providers to cope with the fallout from the coronavirus, but small hospitals have no idea how to access those funds — and many need the money immediately.

What they're saying: "A lot of rural hospitals out there need a cash infusion today," Alan Morgan, CEO of the National Rural Health Association, told Axios. "How is it going to happen? What is the process? There are way more questions than answers."

Go deeperArrowMar 27, 2020 - Health

What Biden's big Super Tuesday means for health care

Illustration: Axios Visuals

Health care has become the framework that defines the broader ideological and stylistic divisions within the Democratic primary — a contest between political revolution and Medicare for All vs. bipartisan compromise and a public option.

Yes, but: It's kind of a false choice. Passing either of those health care plans would require a knock-down, drag-out party-line brawl just as intense as the fight over the Affordable Care Act.

Go deeperArrowMar 4, 2020 - Health