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Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Labor activists with the Fight for $15 and a union movement are publishing a memo Monday obtained first by Axios that will push McDonald's to suspend its quarterly dividend. The group wants McDonald's to instead prioritize increasing sick pay for more workers at $15 an hour.

What it means: The group is seeking a dedication of $61.2 million to cover 10% of workers for additional sick leave for two weeks, putting the price tag at "just 6.6% of the expected quarterly dividend to be paid on June 15."

What they're saying: The memo takes aim at a silent video tweeted by McDonald's showing support for George Floyd and other black men and boys killed in recent years to call for the company to use a portion of its dividend to pay workers rather than shareholders.

  • "Rather than an empty PR social media posting, the company could demonstrate its purported stance by, for once, halting its dividend and redirecting that money towards helping its frontline workers weather a pandemic disproportionately impacting people of color."

The bottom line: Dozens of companies have suspended or cut their dividends this year, citing economic uncertainty brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.

  • McDonald's is one of a handful that has maintained it — for a 44th straight year — but could be facing renewed pressure from activists in addition to the pandemic and deteriorating economy.

Go deeper: The new labor movement

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
Aug 18, 2020 - Economy & Business

Coronavirus brings a wave of early retirements

Photo illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios. Photo by George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty Images.

The coronavirus is already triggering early retirements. That's bad news for the American economy, experts say.

Why it matters: "It’s a missed opportunity if people are being forced to retire early," London Business School's Scott says. "There's a big impact on their lifetime earnings and a big impact on lifetime expenditures. And that has macroeconomic consequences."

20 mins ago - Health

Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

Photo illustration by STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Moderna announced that it plans to file with the FDA Monday for an emergency use authorization for its coronavirus vaccine, which the company said has an efficacy rate of 94.1%.

Why it matters: Moderna will become the second company to file for a vaccine EUA after Pfizer did the same earlier this month, potentially paving the way for the U.S. to have two COVID-19 vaccines in distribution by the end of the year. The company said its vaccine has a 100% efficacy rate against severe COVID cases.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.