Jan 30, 2019

McConnell slams Election Day holiday proposal as Democrat "power grab"

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) on Wednesday railed against a sweeping election reform and anti-corruption package by House Democrats that includes a proposal to make Election Day a federal holiday, which he claimed would hand Democrats too much power.

"This is the Democrat plan to restore democracy? A brand-new week of paid vacation for every federal employee who would like to hover around while you cast your ballot? A Washington-based taxpayer-subsidized clearinghouse for political campaign funding? A power grab that’s smelling more and more like what it is.”

The big picture: Other provisions in the bill, which McConnell mocks as the "Democratic Politician Protection Act," would increase federal funding and provide paper ballots for state voter systems, expand access to early and online voter registration, restrict big money in politics, and require presidents to disclose their tax returns.

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Primary elections test impact of protests, coronavirus on voting

Election official at a polling place at McKinley Technology High School in Washington, D.C. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In the midst of a global pandemic and national protests over the death of George Floyd, eight states and the District of Columbia held primary elections on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, needs to win 425 of the 479 delegates up for grabs in order to officially clinch the nomination. There are a number of key down-ballot races throughout the country as well, including a primary in Iowa that could determine the fate of Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

Updated 10 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Updates: George Floyd protests continue past curfews

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day, prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: Protesters were still out en masse even as curfews set in in New York City and Washington, D.C.. Large crowds took a knee at Arizona's state capitol nearly an hour before the statewide 8 p.m. curfew, and a peaceful march dispersed in Chicago ahead of the city's 9 p.m. curfew.

RNC officially plans to move 2020 convention to new city

President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and their families on the final night of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, on July 21, 2016. Photo: David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images

The Republican National Committee is scrambling for a new convention host city after President Trump said North Carolina’s coronavirus restrictions will make Charlotte unworkable for the crowds he’s counting on.

Driving the news: The organization is still hoping to conduct the convention's "official business" in Charlotte, an RNC spokesperson said. But the part that most Americans think about the convention — the spectacle of the speakers and the president accepting the Republican nomination itself — will be held in a different state with more relaxed COVID-19 laws.