Zero Hour founder Jamie Margolin, L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti and Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo attend a press conference in Copenhagen in conjunction with the C40 Mayors Summit on Oct. 9. Photo: Liselotte Sabroe/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

Mayors from 94 cities committed to cutting emissions from the sectors that most contribute to climate change (transportation, buildings, industry and waste) to keep global temperatures below the 1.5-degree Celsius goal of the Paris Agreement.

The big picture: The Global New Green Deal was announced today at the C40 Mayors Summit in Copenhagen. Despite the U.S. government pulling out of the Paris Climate Agreement, cities have committed to meeting greenhouse gas reduction goals.

"As mayors, our primary responsibility is to protect the lives and livelihoods of our citizens. Climate change now represents the greatest threat to their security, public health and prosperity," said Frank Jensen, lord mayor of Copenhagen, in a press conference.

  • He added that Copenhagen wants to be the first carbon-neutral capital city by 2025, and carbon emissions are down 40% since 2005.

What's next: Cutting global emissions in half by 2030 is necessary to void the worst impacts of the climate crisis, experts say. That means setting strict building codes, replacing fossil fuel energy sources with clean alternatives and dramatically reducing waste.

  • Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said we are entering a "make-or-break decade."
  • "Far from being in conflict, working on the ecology and economy go hand in hand. These two things are inextricably linked. In fact, we can build a more sustainable city at the same time we protect workers and create new careers," Garcetti said.

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
49 mins ago - Economy & Business

CEO confidence skyrockets on expectations of layoffs and wage cuts

U.S. consumers remain uncertain about the economic environment but CEOs are feeling incredibly confident, the latest survey from the Conference Board shows.

Why it matters: Confidence among chief executives jumped 19 points from its last reading in July, rising above the 50-point threshold that reflects more positive than negative responses for the first time since 2018.

Louisville officer: "Breonna Taylor would be alive" if we had served no-knock warrant

Breonna Taylor memorial in Louisville. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, the Louisville officer who led the botched police raid that caused the death of Breonna Taylor, said the No. 1 thing he wishes he had done differently is either served a "no-knock" warrant or given five to 10 seconds before entering the apartment: "Breonna Taylor would be alive, 100 percent."

Driving the news: Mattingly, who spoke to ABC News and Louisville's Courier Journal for his public interview, was shot in the leg in the initial moments of the March 13 raid. Mattingly did not face any charges after Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said he and another officer were "justified" in returning fire to protect themselves against Taylor's boyfriend.

U.S. vs. Google — the siege begins

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Justice Department fired the starter pistol on what's likely to be a years-long legal siege of Big Tech by the U.S. government when it filed a major antitrust suit Tuesday against Google.

The big picture: Once a generation, it seems, federal regulators decide to take on a dominant tech company. Two decades ago, Microsoft was the target; two decades before that, IBM.