Julia Steyn is the new CEO of scooter company Bolt Mobility (Images courtesy of Bolt)

Julia Steyn, who ran GM's urban car-sharing service, Maven, until early this year, has been named CEO of Bolt Mobility, a Miami Beach-based electric scooter company co-founded by Olympic sprinter Usain Bolt.

Why it matters: Bolt's co-founders B. Sarah Haynes and Kamyar Kaviani will step aside as co-CEOs to make room for Steyn, whose urban mobility experience is expected to help the 1-year-old company improve and refine its business model. Renting scooters today, Bolt had intended to add a shared electric car to its lineup in 2020, but the company now says it has scrapped that plan.

"As cities continue to re-envision their transportation infrastructure to accommodate expansion, growing populations and increased congestion, micromobility solutions are even more vital," Steyn said in a statement.

The intrigue: The name of Steyn's new company is strikingly similar to the Chevrolet Bolt EV sold by her former employer.

Go deeper: Modern cars are testing the limits of their computer hardware

Editor's note: This story was updated to reflect that the 2020 car project promoted on its website is no longer a priority.

Go deeper

5 mins ago - Sports

Sports return stalked by coronavirus

Tampa Bay Rays left fielder Austin Meadows bumps elbows Friday during a workout at Tropicana Field. Photo: Kim Klement/USA Today Sports via Reuters

When MLB teams arrived at the ballpark this weekend for the first summer workouts of 2020, the comforting sounds of baseball brought smiles to players' faces.

Between the lines: Even the loudest crack of the bat couldn't mask the eery silence, or distract from the ever-present coronavirus threat.

39 mins ago - Health

239 scientists call on WHO to recognize coronavirus as airborne

People walk at the boardwalk in Venice Beach. Photo: Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

A group of 239 scientists in 32 countries is calling for the World Health Organization to revise its recommendations to account for airborne transmission as a significant factor in how the coronavirus spreads, the New York Times reports.

The big picture: The WHO has said the virus mainly spreads via large respiratory droplets that fall to the ground once they've been discharged in coughs and sneezes. But the scientists say evidence shows the virus can spread from smaller particles that linger in air indoors.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 11,294,859 — Total deaths: 531,419 — Total recoveries — 6,078,552Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 2,839,917 — Total deaths: 129,676 — Total recoveries: 894,325 — Total tested: 34,858,427Map.
  3. States: Photos of America's pandemic July 4 ICU beds in Arizona hot spot near capacity.
  4. Public health: U.S. coronavirus infections hit record highs for 3 straight days.
  5. Politics: Trump extends PPP application deadlineKimberly Guilfoyle tests positive.
  6. World: Mexican leaders call for tighter border control as infections rise in U.S.
  7. Sports: 31 MLB players test positive as workouts resume.
  8. 1 📽 thing: Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback.