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Cover: Regnery Publishing

Matt Whitaker, who became acting attorney general after President Trump canned Jeff Sessions, will be out May 19 with a book titled: "Above the Law: The Inside Story of How the Justice Department Tried to Subvert President Trump."

Why it matters: It's not every day — or every decade — that a former head of a department accuses his old workplace of trying to sabotage the president.

  • The cover shows the faces of former FBI officials James Comey, Andrew McCabe and Peter Strzok.
  • House Intelligence Committee ranking member Devin Nunes — the O.G. of anti-Deep State crusaders — has written the foreword.

Go deeper: Momentum builds against acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker

Go deeper

Nadler accuses Barr of undermining democratic norms in opening statement

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) painted the integrity of the Justice Department as "more at risk than at any time in modern history" in opening remarks at a hearing for Attorney General Bill Barr Tuesday, accusing him of shielding President Trump from responsibility and eroding democratic norms.

Why it matters: The hearing, which focuses on the DOJ's alleged politicization under Barr, is the attorney general's first time appearing before the committee. Barr in his own remarks accused the committee's Democrats of trying to discredit him over his investigations into the origins of the FBI's Russia probe.

Jul 28, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Judiciary Democrats to grill Barr on "politicization" of DOJ

Barr speaks at the White House July 22. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Judiciary Committee Democrats plan to press Attorney General Bill Barr at a hearing today on what they'll argue is his politicization of the Justice Department to serve President Trump's personal agenda.

Why it matters: Democrats have a lot of pent up frustration over a series of recent policies put forth by the DOJ, and have been preparing months for this moment.

Collins helps contractor before pro-Susan PAC gets donation

Sen. Susan Collins during her reelection campaign. Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty Images

A PAC backing Sen. Susan Collins in her high-stakes reelection campaign received $150,000 from an entity linked to the wife of a defense contractor whose firm Collins helped land a federal contract, new public records show.

Why it matters: The executive, Martin Kao of Honolulu, leaned heavily on his political connections to boost his business, federal prosecutors say in an ongoing criminal case against him. The donation linked to Kao was veiled until last week.