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Mary Ann Mendoza with President Trump at the White House in 2019. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Mary Ann Mendoza, who was scheduled to address the Republican National Convention on Tuesday, was pulled from the program hours before it began after she retweeted an anti-Semitic rant on Twitter, which has since been deleted.

Why it matters: Mendoza urged her more than 40,000 Twitter followers to investigate an alleged Jewish plot to enslave the world, linking to a thread of tweets from a QAnon conspiracy theorist, The Daily Beast first reported.

  • Mendoza was supposed to be at the GOP convention representing "angel moms," a term the president made popular among his base that denotes a mother whose child was killed by an undocumented immigrant.
  • Mendoza's son was killed in 2014 by a drunk driver who was living in the U.S. illegally.

What she's saying: After various media outlets covered her tweet, Mendoza deleted the thread and posted that she had "retweeted a very long thread earlier without reading every post within the thread."

  • "My apologies for not paying attention to the intent of the whole message. That does not reflect my feelings or personal thoughts whatsoever," she wrote.

Axios reached out to the Republican National Committee for comment and has not heard back.

Go deeper: QAnon's 2020 resurgence

Go deeper

Lindsey Graham: "QAnon is bats--t crazy"

Photo: Carolyn Kaster-Pool/Getty Images

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told Snapchat's "Good Luck America" that “QAnon is bats--t crazy," adding that he believes the conspiracy theory is "very much a threat."

The big picture: QAnon has grown increasingly popular in mainstream Republican politics, with multiple supporters winning congressional primaries — most notably Marjorie Taylor Greene, who is likely to enter the House after winning the GOP nomination in a deep-red Georgia district.

Scoop: Trump tells confidants he plans to pardon Michael Flynn

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

President Trump has told confidants he plans to pardon his former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to the FBI about his Russian contacts, two sources with direct knowledge of the discussions tell Axios.

Behind the scenes: Sources with direct knowledge of the discussions said Flynn will be part of a series of pardons that Trump issues between now and when he leaves office.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
4 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

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