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Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo / Axios

"Fire Mark Zuckerberg" has become a rallying cry for the #DeleteFacebook crowd, as controversy continues to swirl over revelations that 50 million users had their personal data improperly accessed by a Trump-linked analytics firm.

Reality check: Zuck isn't going anywhere.

  • For starters, Zuckerberg has so much voting stock that the board can't technically fire him, even if it wants to (which it doesn't).
  • He could always step down under internal pressure, but it's hard to imagine he'd do so given his longstanding emphasis on founder control. And, again, this isn't like the situation at Uber where board members think they've been misled.
  • Second, there is no obvious successor. The rest of his co-founders are long gone, and number two Sheryl Sandberg would seem to have just as much culpability for what's gone wrong.

But there is one place Mark Zuckerberg is almost certain to go, whether he wants to or not: Capitol Hill.

Go deeper

Scoop: Trump tells confidants he plans to pardon Michael Flynn

Photo: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

President Trump has told confidants he plans to pardon his former national security adviser Michael Flynn, who pleaded guilty in December 2017 to lying to the FBI about his Russian contacts, two sources with direct knowledge of the discussions tell Axios.

Behind the scenes: Sources with direct knowledge of the discussions said Flynn will be part of a series of pardons that Trump issues between now and when he leaves office.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
4 hours ago - World

Remote work shakes up geopolitics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The global adoption of remote work may leave the rising powers in the East behind.

The big picture: Despite India's and China's economic might, these countries have far fewer remote jobs than the U.S. or Europe. That's affecting the emerging economies' resilience amid the pandemic.

Trump gives Biden access to presidential intelligence briefings

Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The Trump White House on Tuesday gave President-elect Biden access to daily presidential intelligence briefings, a source familiar with the matter tells Axios.

Why it matters: Trump has refused to share the briefs until now, as he continues to challenge the result of the election and declines to concede. The president's acquiescence comes as another sign that the transition to a Biden administration is taking place.